Undergraduate Courses

AML 3311
Major Figures in American Literature: The U.S. Literary Revolution, 1850-1855
John Mac Kilgore
jmkilgore@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm-2:35 pm, WMS 02

Why was so much great US literature published between 1850 and 1855? That’s the question we will try to answer in this course. Over seventy years ago, F. O. Matthiessen coined the term the “American Renaissance” to describe the inventive outpouring of national literature in this half-decade—classics such as Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850), Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Whitman’s Leaves of Grass (1855). While scholars have long since criticized and revised Matthiessen’s exclusively white, male club of “renaissance” writers, it remains a curious fact that many of the most significant texts in today’s expanded canon were also published in the same half-decade—among them, Sojourner Truth’s “I Am a Woman’s Rights” (1851), William Wells Brown’s Clotel (1853), John Rollin Ridge’s The Life and Adventures of Joaquín Murieta (1854), Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall (1854), and Frederick Douglass’s My Bondage and My Freedom (1855). In a survey of “major figures,” 1850-1855, we will work to understand this broad literary revolution across US letters. To do so, we will consider the historical context, publishing world, political movements, and aesthetic forms/genre experimentation that situate this body of literature.

AML 3311
Major Figures in American Literature: Mobilizing the Nation
Wayne Reed
wreed@fsu.edu
MWF 9:20 am – 10:10 am, WMS 201

What does it mean to be socially mobile in the United States? We often think it simply means working hard to transcend the limits of class. But American fiction is full of alternative versions of social mobility that raise important questions about how movements are generated, how people are mobilized, and how motion contributes to and subverts the notions of the nation. In this class we will explore a diverse set of literary texts that reveal contradictory and paradoxical attitudes toward social mobility. Some of our key questions will include: How do ideas of mobility and settlement condition the bloody conflicts of settler colonialism? How do the enslaved open up unauthorized fugitive passages to freedom? How do women confined to domestic roles mobilize for autonomy?

AML 3630
Latino/a Literature in English
Virgilio Suárez
vsuarez@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am-11:00 am, WMS 031

We will be reading and discussing major figure in contemporary LatinX authors with a healthy sprinkling of poets thrown in for good measure. Cristina Garcia, Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alvarez, Alberto Rios, Benjamin Alire Saenz and many more. The class will also include a brief but calculated history of LatinX literature in the United States since the Chicano Movement and the new migrations. Readings TBA.

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors.

AML 3682
American Multi-Ethnic Literature
Brooke Bradley
babradley@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45am - 11:00 am, WMS 0319

Historically, the traditional American literary canon has been composed primarily of male, white authors which ignores the diverse range of works, authors, and themes essential to American Literature. We will combat this erasure by focusing on contemporary texts (1960s-present) that attend to socio-economic issues, social class, sex and gender, identity, citizenship, and historical narratives frequently omitted from the American educational system. In doing so, we will explore American society’s nuances, investigate the cultural commentary and criticism within the scholarly field, and ask how the aforementioned elements can change the American canon in the future. Questions we will consider include: What makes a piece of literature American? How do the texts we address alter the perception of American identity and culture? What can we do as readers to restore these often forgotten or minimally discussed issues to mainstream literature? By the semester’s conclusion, you will be able to analyze how our class texts reveal the many facets of the United States and the plurality of American identity and experiences. This course satisfies distribution requirements for Diversity.
Possible readings include:
Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng (ISBN: 978-0143127550)
The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (ISBN: 978-0525536291)
Chemistry by Weike Wang (ISBN: 978-1524731748)
Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu (ISBN: 978-0307907196)

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors.

AML 4213
Early American Literature and Culture: Old Florida: Literature, Place, Public Memory
John Mac Kilgore
Office Number: WMS 324 jmkilgore@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am -12:50 pm, WMS 121B

How does Florida (especially Tallahassee) choose to preserve, narrate, and commemorate its early history through museums, memorials, monuments, and other historical sites? What does Mission San Luis say—or not say—about Spanish colonization of the area, the Goodwood Museum about plantation slavery? How does our “public memory” of Florida change, how are official histories challenged, when we prioritize Black and Indigenous voices and knowledge, literature, and culture? And more to the point for this class, can we think of literature as itself a form of cultural memory opening up alternative narrative perspectives on Florida history and culture? This course will tackle questions such as these by surveying the early literature of Florida from the period of first nations through the nineteenth century, and then putting our reading into conversation with sites of public memory in and around Tallahassee. That means you will be making a few site visits in town and analyzing the material rhetorics of history and place. The goal is to understand the political, cultural, and literary legacy of Florida, yesterday and today, from an anti-racist, anti-colonial viewpoint. We will consider the power of early Florida literature to shape our contemporary politics of public memory; conversely, we will approach sites of public memory as narrative forms which tell weighted stories about Florida at the intersection of fact and fiction, history, and ideology.

This course meets the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

AML 4604
The African American Literary Tradition: Meditations on the Body
Maxine L. Montgomery
mmontgomery@fsu.edu
T/Th, 11:35 am-12:50 pm

This Diversity in Western Experience ("Y") course directs attention to the body as cultural metaphor and social convention in representative works of fiction by black writers in a diasporic geography. Relying upon recent scholarship on blackness as a trope for a traumatic history involving slavery, colonization, and Jim Crow as well as a site for realizing radically-transformed futures, we will discuss a range of novels in relation to a fluid trans-Atlantic history. Our readings will also consider gendered and queered bodies as loci for reimagining resistant subjectivities existing within and outside a dominant historiography. Issues of post-human or trans-human constructions, border-crossing, and liminality will figure prominently in our conversation along with ideas surrounding Afro-futurism -- the close connection between black cultural traditions and the realms of science and technology in framing alternative worlds featuring an erasure of social hierarchies and gender binaries.

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors and the Diversity in Western Experience (y) requirement for Liberal Studies.

CRW 3110
Fiction Technique
Ravi Howard
ryhoward@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am-11:00 am, WMS 0120

We will study many of the core elements of fictional narratives, such as character development, dialogue, point-of-view, setting, and object. We will focus on the characters’ actions and the consequences of those actions. As we write dialogue, we will consider what characters choose to say and what remains in their interiors. Our textbooks will be Writing Fiction, Tenth Edition: A Guide to Narrative Craft by Janet Burroway and Best American Short Stories 2021 edited by Jesmyn Ward. These books will provide a snapshot of contemporary fiction, and we will assess the craft lessons the writers have provided. Our creative practice will include weekly writing assignments based on prompts, a midterm short story, and a final writing portfolio. We will focus on generating original work and understanding how the revision process can sharpen our ideas.

CRW 3110
Fiction Technique
Erin Slaughter
eslaughter@fsu.edu
MWF 12:00 pm-12:50 pm, WMS 0002

This course is an undergraduate creative writing workshop focused on the craft technique, writing, critique, and revision of short fiction. While there is much to learn from the historical evolution of the short story, this class will focus on fiction written, published, and received by audiences in the 21st century—just as the work of student writers in the class will be. By reading and discussing a wide range of contemporary short fiction—including flash fiction, magical realism, hybrid genres, digital/interactive fiction, and illustrated texts, alongside traditional narrative-based works—students will discover the trends, techniques, and styles that are prevalent in fiction today. Through exposure to new possibilities in writing, assisted by generative exercises that encourage students to compose in experimental modes, as well as those that come most naturally to them, students will form a foundation from which they can begin to determine, first, the literary lineages and influences that shape their own writing, and second, where their individual voices fit into today’s ever-shifting literary landscape.

CRW 3110
Fiction Technique
Ernie Reynolds
CEREYNOLDS@FSU.EDU
M/W 3:05 pm-4:20 pm, WMS 0217

In this course, we’ll work with the attitude that all apprentice fiction can be improved. This class is designed as a traditional creative writing workshop in which you will strive to improve your narrative writing and revising skills by receiving feedback from your peers. The majority of our time will be spent reading and critiquing one another’s work. However, because reading is as crucial to your writing development as drafting and revising, we will also spend time learning to read published fiction with the keen and critical eye of a maturing writer. We will discuss the fundamentals of traditional fiction as well as the elements and purpose of experimental writing and you will be challenged to find where your work falls on this spectrum. Last but not least, we will practice writing strategies found in the course text. Each component is an important aspect of your growth as a writer.

CRW 3311
Poetic Technique
Brett Hanley
bh18d@my.fsu.edu
Tu/Th 8:00 am – 9:15 am, WMS 310

This course will cover various poetic techniques including the use of images, figurative language, voice, style, meter, rhyme, and form. The class will culminate in a workshop that allows students to share their work and critique the work of their peers.

CRW 3311
Poetic Technique
Hera Naguib
hn18c@my.fsu.edu
M/W 4:50 pm—6:05 pm, WMS 0108

This course is for aspiring poets and critics. It is designed for students who aspire to practice the art of reading and writing poetry. We will begin by examining some fundamental elements (voice, diction, imagery, rhythm, etc.) and subgenres of poetry (narrative, ode, elegy, ghazal etc.). Through class lectures and student discussion leaders and/or presentations, we will read a variety of modern and contemporary poets to identify and discuss these elements individually as well as how they organically come together to make a poem work. We will also identify what constitutes common conventions of a subgenre within poetry. In conjunction with these readings, we will complete several short exercises that will sharpen our understanding of how individual craft elements and genre conventions can be realized through writing. Though the reading and analysis of poetry is a vital part of this class, our primary focus is your poetry, which we will discuss at length during the workshops. Students are required to hand in one original poem each alternate week and write letters of critique that will offer a review of their peers’ poems. Prompts may be available for the workshops. The course will culminate in a final portfolio of six to seven revised poems and a reflection essay of 1500 words that prefaces the poems in the portfolio.

CRW 3311
Poetic Technique: “a formal feeling comes – ”
KT
klt19e@my.fsu.edu
TBD

CRW 3311 is for aspiring poets and critics. Students need not have a robust background in reading or writing poetry – rather a healthy curiosity is highly encouraged. This course studies both the formal and technical elements of poetry with some student practice in writing poetry. Students will learn various poetic forms and techniques – their complex histories, how to architect them perfectly, how to smash them into smithereens, how to know when to do both and why. Through reading, listening to, discussing, writing, pondering, revising, and performing poetic forms and techniques over the course of a semester, students will come to possess the composition tools necessary to continue writing in the poetic tradition, with the hopes of producing a selection of their own publishable poetry to augment our literary canon.

CRW 3410
Course Title: Dramatic Technique: Playwriting in the Now
Jillian Weise
jweise@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 4:50 pm– 6:05 pm, WMS 0317

Playwright Caryl Churchill says, “You make beauty and it disappears. I love that.” Plays are ethereal by nature: pinned by time and space, here today and gone tomorrow. You cannot see Romeo and Juliet at The Globe as it was originally cast and staged. You can only read about it. How to write a play now? and now? and a play that will last 500 years? Do not underestimate yourself. You are already writing plays when you post a story to Instagram or create a TikTok. But these platforms expect your work only to disappear. They neglect to consider that you are an artist and you aim to “make beauty.” The majority of class time will be spent on the workshop of your short plays.

CRW 4120
Fiction Workshop
Course Pre-Requisites: CRW 3110 Fiction Technique
Mark Winegardner
mwinegardner@fsu.edu
W, 6:35 pm-9:35 pm, WMS 415

The objective of this nurturing, rigorous fiction workshop is the creation, revision, and realization of competent apprentice-level short fiction. The course is structured so that you’re free to fail (and you will), but you'll learn how to embrace the positive, liberating value of the kind of failure that's crucial to any true artist's apprenticeship. If you do the work and trust the process, you're certain to walk away from this class a more sophisticated reader and a dramatically better writer.

We’ll prioritize four fundamentals that you can think of the way a handyman might regard a hammer, saw, screwdriver, and wrench—simple, maybe, but if you can't use them well, you can't do much of anything:
1. What's really meant by the oversimplified advice "show, don't tell."
2. Acute tension and chronic tension (what that means, how nearly all stories are an interplay between
those two elements, how those elements are created from the very opening of the story).
3. Short-story structure, with a particular emphasis on openings.
4. Basic narrative shapes.

This course meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

CRW 4120
Fiction Workshop
Course Pre-Requisites: CRW 3110 Fiction Technique, instructor permission
Robert Olen Butler
rbutler@fsu.edu
M 6:35 pm - 9:35 pm, WMS 0002

The spring undergraduate fiction workshop under Robert Olen Butler, as it traditionally does, will focus intensively on the essentials of process in creating literary narrative. He has found that the most elusive of these essentials are best explored by his proposing an aesthetic theory of the short short story, both as a distinct art form and as a paradigm for the beginning of any effective work of fiction, and then working strictly in that form for most, if not all, of the semester.

Prospective student must submit to instructor first 500 words of a piece of their fiction for approval to enroll. (Send to rbutler@fsu.edu) Prospective student must have successfully completed

This course meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

CRW 4320
Poetry Workshop
Course Pre-Requisites: CRW 3311 Poetry Technique, instructor permission
David Kirby
dkirby@fsu.edu
W 3:05 pm-6:05 pm, WMS 120

In A Few Good Voices in My Head, Ted Solotaroff says that a piece of writing is a writer’s “only way to organize and to some extent comprehend life’s fullness and perplexity.” In this class we’ll be studying and writing that kind of poem in a format that departs from the traditional workshop set-up. There’s nothing wrong with sitting in a circle and passing poems around and discussing them, but here we’ll mainly be studying craft in the first month and, after that, alternating between select students giving 20-minute readings of their work to the rest of the class and roundtable discussions of additional craft issues and particular poems presented by individual students. Expect to write a poem a week and, when you’re not sharing it with the class, sending it to the instructor. Expect as well to partner with someone with whom you’ll swap poems weekly and also exchange portfolios in the last week of class. The result? More fully realized and engaging poems. By the way, I call this class “The Solotaroff Protocol” because that sounds vaguely like a Cold War thriller involving a protagonist who (a) starts with a plan that (b) quickly goes awry even though (c) things work out in the end if (d) not in the way anyone thought they would. You know, the way poems do.

This course meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

Note: The Instructor's permission is required for this course. Please fill out the application on the next page and send it to dkirby@fsu.edu.

Completion of this form is required for students seeking admission into the undergraduate poetry workshop with Professor Kirby.

Please submit your application at your earliest possible opportunity; applications will be reviewed as they come in and responded to as soon as possible. Name: ___________________________________ FSUSN: ____________________________ Major: ___________________________________ Expected Graduation Date: _____________ FSU E-Mail Address: ___________________ List all poetry writing classes you have taken, such as CRW 3311 (Poetic Technique) and CRW 4320 (Advanced Workshop). COURSE TERM INSTRUCTOR GRADE

Feel free to add below any other information that might be helpful. Attach a sample of four to five of your recent poems and e-mail this application to dkirby @fsu.edu. Thank you for your interest in this class.

CRW 4320
Poetry Workshop: Finding Your Poetic Voice
Course Pre-Requisites: Poetic Technique and Professor’s permission (if you’re interested in the class, send me a selection of your poems (3-6 in one file) at bhamby@fsu.edu
Barbara Hamby
bhamby@fsu.edu
W 3:05 pm - 6:05pm, WMS 310

Your poetic voice is made up of every characteristic choice you make as a poet. We will look at the elements of voice, including images, metaphors, diction, line, syntax, leaping, duende, and a variety of forms. On Canvas you will find poems and essays that address each of these elements. We will look at these during the first hour of the class, and then we will have a 2-hour workshop. You will be responsible for writing one poem a week. Your final portfolio will be your six best poems.

CRW 4320
Poetry Workshop
Course Pre-Requisites: CRW 3311 Poetry Technique
Jillian Weise
jweise@fsu.edu
Th 6:35 pm – 9:35 pm, WMS 0120

In “A Few Hints toward the Making of Poetry,” Gwendolyn Brooks writes. “If you feature a garden, speak of that garden most personally. If you have murdered in a garden, the grass and flowers (and weeds) will mean something different to you than to someone who has only planted or picked.” Surely, we have not murdered in a garden. But Brooks reminds us that poems are capacious enough for all kinds of speakers. Not just morally righteous speakers. Not just speakers who are beyond reproach. Let the speakers of our poems be opinionated, often wrong, going on too long and wayward from Eden. The majority of class time will be spent on the workshop of your poems.

This course meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

ENC 3310
Article and Essay Technique
Nitya Pandey
np18ba@fsu.edu
MWF 10:40 am-11:30 am, WMS 0002

This course emphasizes the need for students to produce thoughtful, well-constructed texts for a
number of audiences with different expectations and assumptions. Viewed broadly, texts can
include written, visual, digital, and audio communication, which will come together in this class
under a rhetorical framework. Successful writers must learn to negotiate a variety of contexts and
genres in their formal and informal communication. Thus, students need to develop rhetorical
savvy and strategies necessary to successfully enter into dialogue about important issues. Rather
than focusing on a single type of written communication, students in this course will learn
rhetorical analysis as a way to understand texts better and as a means toward improving and
diversifying their own writing. They will engage in the full range of writing
processes—invention, arrangement, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading—for multiple
assignments. Students will also explore multi-media composition, experimenting with combining
written, visual, and audio texts in digital environments.

The core idea of the course is that writing is an ongoing process. Therefore, it requires ample time, continuous effort, judicious revision, and reflection. The course intends to demystify writing through multimodal assignments, exercises, presentations, and reflections. The class operates as an intellectual community where writing helps people think critically and creatively about their own writing processes as well as those of other people, including their classmates. Furthermore, the course helps students view writing through different perspectives, learn to write in diverse contexts, and to write with different purposes, for instance, to inform, entertain, instruct, and express.

This course meets the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

ENC 3310
Article and Essay Technique
Maisha Hossain
mmh19d@fsu.edu
Section 0004: Tu/Th 4:50 pm-6:05 pm, WMS 0120

ENC 3310 is a course for upper-level undergraduate students interested in writing creative nonfiction. “Creative nonfiction,” a common but sometimes misleading term, exists on a spectrum that stretches between researched, journalistic articles on the one hand, and lyrical personal essays on the other. The genre is “nonfiction,” and so it tries to be true—with the recognition that truth is various and not always objective, and that it exists within a contract established between the writer and the reader. At the same time, the genre is “creative” and uses many of the techniques of fiction, such as scenes, dialogue, characters, setting, sensory detail, narrative, plot, story, point of view, conflict, rising tension, climax, denouement, anecdote, etc. In this course, we will explore and practice many styles within the genre of creative nonfiction, though the subjects we study will be largely of an autobiographical and personal nature.

This course meets the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

ENC 3310
Article and Essay Technique: Nonfiction Writing across Time, Space and Modes
Amory Orchard
aeo19c@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 8:00 am-9:15 am, location TBA

Lee Gutkind writes, “Storytelling . . . is as old as the beginning of mankind. People want to receive what's out there in the form of stories, not just facts, opinion, analysis.” This section of ENC 3310: Article and Essay Technique approaches nonfiction as a method of inquiry that spans over thousands of years— across time, space and geography. This historical approach allows us to more closely examine how we assay (“attempt to understand”) personal experiences, as well as what they say about the world beyond ourselves.

Throughout the course, undergraduate students learn the craft of composing nonfiction prose in a variety of modes (e.g. writing character, setting, sensory detail, narrative, point of view). Readings and writing assignments include “traditional” forms such as memoir, personal essay, flash nonfiction, lyric essays, and literary journalism. However, we also immerse ourselves in multimodal and hybrid storytelling, such as: performance nonfiction, narrative-driven comedy specials, podcasts, and photo essays.

This course meets the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

ENC 3310
Article and Essay Technique
Maisha Hossain
mmh19d@fsu.edu
Section 0003: Tu/Th 1:20 pm -2:35 pm, WMS 0217

ENC 3310 is a course for upper-level undergraduate students interested in writing creative nonfiction. “Creative nonfiction,” a common but sometimes misleading term, exists on a spectrum that stretches between researched, journalistic articles on the one hand, and lyrical personal essays on the other. The genre is “nonfiction,” and so it tries to be true—with the recognition that truth is various and not always objective, and that it exists within a contract established between the writer and the reader. At the same time, the genre is “creative” and uses many of the techniques of fiction, such as scenes, dialogue, characters, setting, sensory detail, narrative, plot, story, point of view, conflict, rising tension, climax, denouement, anecdote, etc. In this course, we will explore and practice many styles within the genre of creative nonfiction, though the subjects we study will be largely of an autobiographical and personal nature.

This course meets the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

ENC 3310
Article and Essay Technique
Alexander Odendahl
ao18j@my.fsu.edu
M/W/F 1:20 pm-2:10 pm, WMS 0108

This class focuses on writing and reading nonfiction, wherever that pursuit leads us. To that end, we’ll be reading essays from various authors as well as composing our own. The class is centered around the workshop—everyone will compose one essay, which they will distribute to the class for feedback—as well as discussions about essays written by other authors.

This course is asking you to go beyond the easy, “I liked this, I didn’t like this,” and to be able to fully articulate your ideas of what makes a piece of nonfiction powerful or not. Essentially, this class will urge you to consider why you like the way you like and why you write the way you write.

This course meets the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

ENC 4212
Editing Manuscripts & Documents
Course Pre-Requisites: ENC3416
Perry Howell
phowell@fsu.edu
Section .0001: Tu/Th 9:45 am-11:00 am, WMS 0002

This course will help you to take your editing skills to the next level, explicitly focusing on the work of improving another's writing. It seeks to develop the skills of synthesizing another's ideas and data, structuring and clarifying his or her argument, and ordering coherently any multi-part exposition. It is primarily practical in orientation, covering proofreading, grammar, spelling, fact checking, and line-editing. We consider carefully authorial goals and audience needs and how these should influence the editing process. The course aims to prepare students for the elementary practice of textual production between draft stage and final publication.

ENC 4212
Editing Manuscripts & Documents
Course Pre-Requisites: ENC3416
Perry Howell
phowell@fsu.edu
Section .0002: Tu/Th 11:35 am -- 12:50 pm, WMS 0121

This course will help you to take your editing skills to the next level, explicitly focusing on the work of improving another's writing. It seeks to develop the skills of synthesizing another's ideas and data, structuring and clarifying his or her argument, and ordering coherently any multi-part exposition. It is primarily practical in orientation, covering proofreading, grammar, spelling, fact checking, and line-editing. We consider carefully authorial goals and audience needs and how these should influence the editing process. The course aims to prepare students for the elementary practice of textual production between draft stage and final publication.

ENC 4212
Editing Manuscripts, Documents, and Reports
David Gants
dgants@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am–12:50 pm, WMS 319

This course will provide students with a basic grounding in the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage, plus an overview of the main copyediting styles for capitalization, quotations, and numbers/numerals. Through instructor lectures, small-group tutorials, and editing exercises, students will acquire core skills required to copyedit a wide variety of professional and academic documents.

ENC 4311
Article and Essay Workshop: Narrative Nonfiction
Course Pre-Requisites: Grade of B+ or higher in ENC 3310
Diane Roberts
dkroberts@fsu.edu
M/W 4.50 pm-6.05 pm, WMS 121

Florida is in the middle of an environmental crisis, with disappearing wetlands, diminished wildlife habitat, and over-used and polluted waters. Yet Florida—named for the Easter flowers festival by Juan Ponce de Leon—is still a place of great beauty and astonishing biodiversity. For how long remains to be seen. In this course, we will read nonfiction about the natural world and write our own. Students will produce some short essays on nature (doesn’t have to be Floridian nature) and research and report a long (2500-3000 words) piece of narrative nonfiction exploring some aspect of how humans interact with the other life sharing our planet. You will present a draft to be workshopped, which you will revise and submit with your portfolio. Grades will be based on fulfilling writing and reading assignments, class participation, and revision. NB-this is a serious class for students prepared to work hard.

ENC 4311
Article and Essay Workshop: The Art of Time and Place
Course Pre-Requisites: ENC 3310
Ravi Howard
ryhoward@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am - 12:50 pm, WMS 0110

In this course, I will encourage you to follow your interests and ideas to write essays with insight, clarity, and narrative style. Once we create a vantage point and narrative stance, we can identify the form and structure that best support your writing and your writing-related aspirations. Through writing portfolio assignments and readings, we will write toward a better understanding of the personal essay form. Our textbooks will include Best American Essays and The Art of Time in Memoir. We will read the essays of journalists, scholars, poets, fiction writers, and editors. After we read these selections, we will discuss elements of craft, content, and style. We will consider how the personal essay supports journalism, scholarly writing, and creative forms. During our workshop sessions, we will ask questions of one another about the work that is presented. You will also ask questions in your written responses to one another. Your semester creative portfolio will include two personal essays, and a final project of new or revised work.

This course meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

ENC 4404
Advanced Writing & Editing
phowell@fsu.edu
Perry Howell
phowell@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 3:05 pm-4:20 pm, WMS 0217

This is a course about helping yourself, and helping others, to use writing to think and communicate more clearly. This class strives to help you to improve your writing and editing skills across a wide range of writing situations. We carefully consider matters of audience, tone, and effect. Writing and editing are distinct, though related, skills, and editing yourself is a very different situation than editing the work of others, and we work on both. In this class, we openly confront the challenges to writing and editing well. The primary goals here are that you become a better writer and editor at the end of the class than you were at the beginning, regardless of your starting level of competence and confidence. This class will help you to get better at organizing ideas and at getting those ideas across to others. We read and discuss a lot of writing, and, especially, do a lot of writing and editing. Your success in this course depends on your whole-hearted engagement in these activities.

ENG 2610
The Graphic Novel
Aaron Rodriguez
arodriguez12@fsu.edu
8:00 am-9:15 am, WMS 0217

This course examines comics, graphic novels, words-and-pictures as an imaginative art from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first century. Students will be exposed to a spectrum of comic-art forms and a variety of modes and genres. Students will also be asked to read several examples of contemporary comics scholarship.

ENG 3014
Understanding Theory and Criticism: Frankenstein, Theory, and Criticism
J. Pascoe
jpascoe@fsu.edu
Th 3:05 pm-4:20 pm, WMS 121B

We will use Mary Shelley’s nightmare story as a testing ground for literary theory and literary criticism. Shelley’s Frankenstein has inspired a proliferation of creative works (films, comic books, novels), but also a broad array of critical responses. We’ll read influential works of critical theory (including those of Claudia Rankine, Immanuel Kant, Mary Wollstonecraft, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, and Judith Butler) and explore how these thinkers’ ideas enrich our understanding of Shelley’s iconic novel. Grades will be based on class preparation and participation, quizzes, reading notes, and short papers.

This course meets a core requirements for LMC majors.

ENG 3021
Rhetoric
Jake Hennessy
jh20ha@my.fsu.edu
MW 4:50 pm – 6:05 pm, WMS 0121

ENG 3021 is one of three core courses for the Editing, Writing, and Media (EWM) track, and as such, the course works to provide a foundation for the major. This course traces scholarly definitions and conceptions of rhetoric through various time periods and mediums of delivery. The course readings will attend to how rhetoric is shaped through traditional conceptions and television and digital mediums, as well as attending to issues of gender, race, class, and technology. We will examine the affordances and constraints of each, as well as how these concepts complicate rhetoric, communication, and meaning making.

ENG 3114
Film Adaptation
Christina Parker-Flynn
cparker@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm-2:35 pm, WMS 319

Since its birth, the cinema and its filmmakers have constantly drawn from literary sources to create narratives in the new medium. In this course, we will study classic and contemporary theories of film adaptation, borrowing as well as breaking from the concept of fidelity, to understand how film engages with literature—and how literary stories are deformed and reformed through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of text-to-film adaptations and explore their wider adaptation “networks”; some will be more classically defined, such as Robert Siodmak’s adaptation of Hemingway’s The Killers (1964), while others will force us to address adaptation as a concept perhaps equal to influence, as when we study the connectivity between Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope (1948) and Thomas de Quincey’s essay “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.” Subsequently, we will also consider how some literature was influenced by film, or adapted itself by “seeing cinematically,” before the cinema even fully evolved.

Films (and relevant source texts) for study may include: Adaptation, Alice in Wonderland, Blade Runner, The Birds, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Killers, Nosferatu, Rashomon, Romeo + Juliet, Rope, and The Tragedy of Macbeth.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

ENG 3310
Film Genres: Zombie Films
Robert Curran
rrc18c@my.fsu.edu
M/W 3:05 pm–4:20 pm, WMS 0121

This course is intended as an introduction to the zombie genre of films. The zombie film has been enjoying unprecedented popularity in the past decade or more, but this horror subgenre has a much longer history. We will explore why the zombie is relevant today and what we learn about humanity through the films. The world of the living dead holds up a mirror to our own and reveals much about the cultural anxieties of a society in any given historical moment.

While there are earlier zombie films such as White Zombie (1932), we will focus on films starting with director George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead (1968). While zombies can be a bleak subject matter, many of the films we will watch are somewhat comical in nature. There will be a lot of reading, writing, film viewing, and discussion in this course.

The subject leads us through difficult terrain (topics like death, corpses, embalming, rotting flesh, cannibalism, etc.), and we will have to sludge through some gore along the way. If you’re squeamish, you may have to cover your eyes at certain moments, but we’re in this together, so talking about what, how, and why we recoil will be one of the subjects of this class.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

ENG 3600
Hollywood Cinema
Farrah Hersh
fhersh@fsu.edu
TBA

When we think of Hollywood what comes to mind? Blockbuster films, Celebrities, Sequels… upon sequels. What about the cinema? Award-worthy, independent film, International, Groundbreaking? Can Hollywood and Cinema coexist? Are they the same thing or do we view them differently? In this course we will examine the film industry through past films, present industry trends, and what the future holds for Hollywood. Throughout the semester we will explore films that changed the movie business, analyzing cycles and genres from the golden age of Hollywood to the Marvel Universe.

Possible films include: Jaws, Toy Story, Foxy Brown, Psycho, The Breakfast Club, Get Out

ENG 3803
History of Text Technology: Text-ing through Imagined Global Communities
Kristy Cherry-Randle
kcherryrandle@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 8:00 am to 9:15 am, WMS 002

Textual transmission has a long global history, and over time, humans have implemented “text” in a variety of discourses. Each technological advancement of textual transmission has unique conventions and problems that affect human understanding and appreciation of material textual culture. Concerning ourselves with changing textual forms, argues D.F. McKenzie, “allows us to describe not only the technical but the social process of their transmission. In those quite specific ways, it accounts for non-book texts, their physical forms, textual versions, technical transmission, institutional control, their perceived meanings, and social effects” (Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts p. 13).

We will begin by asking these questions:
How have humans communicated with each other throughout history? Speech? Visual Images? Text? What modes and mediums does human communication take? How does text evolve? Really, at the heart of this class is the question: how does text move and change from one text technology to another? What problems and implications arise from such radical influences of technological advancement and societal influences? This course will explore and unpack these questions using hands-on projects to understand the challenges each text technology faces and how it influences human understanding.

We will begin our inquiry into the history of text technologies around 30,000 B.C. with the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc Cave of France. Other text technologies we will explore include; cuneiform tablets, papyrus scrolls, using parchment and vellum, paper making. The era of the printing press in early America is unique in its creation of imagined communities which fueled the separation and subsequent revolution between Britain and America. Finally, we will end our journey with Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and society’s intervening role of his revisions in 19th century America.

ENG 3803
History of Text Technologies
Joshua Johnston
jajohnston@fsu.edu
M/W 3:05 pm-4:20 pm, WMS 0121B

Text technologies! Though that term may not be one you’re familiar with (yet), you’re exposed to these every day, from the posts you scrolled through on your preferred social media platform this morning to the textbooks you hauled to class with you. All of these objects represent surprisingly complex ways in which human beings transmit ideas to one another. In this course, we will be examining a variety of text technologies from throughout history, studying not only the way they evolved, but the way the content they conveyed and the cultures in which they existed evolved alongside them. The course is divided into three broad categories – literature, music, and the camera arts – and within these we will explore such varied text technologies as clay tablets, codices, computers, photographs, films, VHS tapes, vinyl records, cassette tapes, and MP3s. The specific examples we will look at cover not only a broad range of historical periods and cultures, but styles and genres.

ENG 3804
History of Illustrated Texts: Illustrating the Natural World
Course Pre-Requisites: ENG 3803 (recommended)
Molly Hand
mhand@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm-2:35 pm, WMS 201

This course examines the complex relationships between word and image in texts ranging from medieval illuminated manuscripts to postmodern graphic novels. We will examine reasons for incorporating images into texts; impacts of graphic representations on audience understanding, meaning, and value of texts; and the interplay between text, image, and culture over the centuries and into our current moment. This class will examine a variety of textual formats (manuscript, print, digital), genres, digital databases, and examples of “found” illustrated texts from everyday life.

More specifically, this course will focus on representations of the natural world – that is, the nonhuman beings that surrounds us – in illustrated texts from bestiaries, herbals, fables, emblems, and scientific treatises, to children’s literature, memes, graphic novels, and beyond. We will examine a range of media, and our discussions will be grounded in critical readings in textual studies as well as ecocriticism and animal studies. This focus will enable students to build a strong foundation of critical thinking skills and knowledge and to achieve course objectives, with potential for application of acquired knowledge and skills in a range of contexts.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

ENG 4020
Rhetorical Theory & Practice: The Rhetoric of Style
Course Pre-Requisites: see advising staff for guidance
E. Dominguez Barajas
edominguezbarajas@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 6:35 pm – 7:50 pm, WMS 0110

This course examines the idea of style and its impact on forms of expression and interpretation. The course initially views matters of style from a familiar perspective—that of broad socio-communicative practice (e.g., appearance, behavior, speech)—but it then moves toward a specialized consideration of style in terms of the written word. The course will involve discussions of diction, sentence structure, paragraphing, the use of punctuation, and figurative language to develop a sense of the dynamics involved in the written word. Students will acquire a vocabulary that enables the analysis of the manifestations of style in particular texts. Students will reach an understanding of style as a rhetorical tool that can be considered in terms of its practical applications and as an indicator of how discourse ensures the maintenance or transformation of culture. Students are advised to take ENG/ENC 3021 before signing up for ENG 4020.

ENG 4020
Rhetorical Theory and Practice
Course Pre-Requisites: see advising staff for guidance
Fleckenstein
kfleckenstein@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am-12:50 pm, WMS 317

In this incarnation of ENG 4020, we explore the rhetorical efforts by which African Americans “wrote themselves” to freedom and citizenship—again and again—across the nineteenth century. Following a historical trajectory, we begin with overview of Black nineteenth-century rhetoric, aligning it with the complicated history of U.S. citizenship. We then investigate Black rhetoric in three (of eight) moments W. E. B. Du Bois identifies in 1945 as significant in the struggle for Black civil rights: 1800-1850, examining the rhetoric of colonization; 1850-1865, addressing a rhetoric of Black civic virtue; and 1884-1900, analyzing the rhetoric of the “New Negro.” Throughout, we analyze specific rhetorical performances of Black citizenship, identifying rhetors’ use the available means of persuasion, their invention of new means of persuasion, and their creative appropriation of emerging print and photographic technologies. Grades are based on the following: a primary source essay (this involves archival research as well as the use of secondary sources), midterm essay exam (with an evaluative reflection), and assorted activities (including 6-8 ruminations” as well as 6-8 “news of the day” presentations drawn from nineteenth-century African American periodicals). Students are advised to take ENG/ENC 3021 before signing up for ENG 4020.

ENG 4815
What is a Text?
Michael Healy
mhealy@fsu.edu
M/W/F 10:40-11:30, WMS 121

The word "textuality" names a problem and opens a possibility. This course is a sustained inquiry into textuality, texts, and their meaning(s), playing with different notions of how a text comes to be and do work in the world. In order to explore textuality, this course will play with text(s + uality) as techne. Aristotle defines techne as a useful, teachable, and productive art—a practical skill with a systematic knowledge or experience which underlies it. However, many theories have questioned the role and even nature of text, author, and utility in the production, circulation, and reception of texts.

We will use historiography to explore how texts come to have histories and operate as always-already contextually and rhetorically situated, using archives and archival practices to situate and build relationships between texts. We will consider how digital technologies have shaped our notions of textuality, especially when considering questions of audiences, computation, and the experiences of texts. In doing so we will examine how algorithms, circulation, and hypertext have both changed and reinforced notions of textuality. We will work at places of praxis, where theory meets practice, to critique, study, and produce texts.

ENG 4815
What Is a Text?
David Gants
dgants@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 3:30 pm–4:20 pm, WMS 201

This course explores the many ways in which we create, reproduce, circulate, and interpret a “text,” a term that encompasses all manner of human expression. We will approach the subject from several different avenues: Media, how humans have used clay and wood, paper and film, and electronic representations; Reproduction, how we employ scribes, printing presses, cameras, microphones, and computers to generate multiple copies; Agency, how multiple individuals shape the creation, reproduction, and content of texts; Genre, how we employ different forms with different expectations; Apprehension, how culture, criticism, paratexts, and other interpretive forces affect reception; Translation, how texts change across languages, cultures, and media; Commerce, how the business of text works.

ENG 4834
Issues in Publishing: Subversions in Publishing
Course Pre-Requisites: 3000-level core courses in the major recommended but not required
Jessi Thomsen
jthomsen@fsu.edu
Section .0001:, MWF 12 pm-12:50 pm, WMS 204

The publishing industry has long privileged particular perspectives—through combinations of technology, politics, access, and power structures—and we will consider the choices made in publishing in terms of their potential to perpetuate or to subvert such privileges. In this class, we will consider forms and practices of publishing that operate to subvert, question, and complicate mainstream or traditional publishing practices and values. As we weigh these dynamics and their consequences, we will engage in a variety of exercises from evaluating manuscripts to conceptualizing and editing material to marketing a product.

The course will be divided into several short units that cover a range of conversations including topics such as: Riot Grrrl and zine culture; BIPOC presses and literary magazines; open access and traditional academic publishing; self, independent, boutique, and traditional publishing; and abolitionist newspapers and pamphlets. These conversations will deepen our historical, theoretical, and practical understanding of publishing, with short assignments built into each unit. The course will culminate with both a theoretical project that explores a current issue in publishing and a practical project that proposes a new publication.

ENG 4834
Issues in Publishing: Subversions in Publishing
Course Pre-Requisites: 3000-level core courses in the major recommended but not required
Jessi Thomsen
jthomsen@fsu.edu
Section .0002: MWF 9:20 am-10:10 am, WMS 317

The publishing industry has long privileged particular perspectives—through combinations of technology, politics, access, and power structures—and we will consider the choices made in publishing in terms of their potential to perpetuate or to subvert such privileges. In this class, we will consider forms and practices of publishing that operate to subvert, question, and complicate mainstream or traditional publishing practices and values. As we weigh these dynamics and their consequences, we will engage in a variety of exercises from evaluating manuscripts to conceptualizing and editing material to marketing a product.

The course will be divided into several short units that cover a range of conversations including topics such as: Riot Grrrl and zine culture; BIPOC presses and literary magazines; open access and traditional academic publishing; self, independent, boutique, and traditional publishing; and abolitionist newspapers and pamphlets. These conversations will deepen our historical, theoretical, and practical understanding of publishing, with short assignments built into each unit. The course will culminate with both a theoretical project that explores a current issue in publishing and a practical project that proposes a new publication.

ENG 4934
Senior Seminar in Literature: Jane Austen and/as Popular Culture
Course Pre-Requisites: Ninety semester hours of college work
Eckert
leckert@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 pm-12:50 pm, WMS 0002

In this course we will consider how Jane Austen’s novels engage with the popular culture of her own era and have, more than two hundred years later, shaped today’s popular culture from the Bridgeton series to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies to the movie Clueless. Reading closely the content and narrative form her novels, we will explore how Austen represents and critiques her contemporary society. For example, we will ask how Pride and Prejudice engages debates about love and money (not to mention dancing), how Northanger Abbey satirizes the craze for gothic fiction, and how Emma depicts changing notions about class and education. These questions will help us understand why Austen’s fiction interested her original readers and why her work—in its original form as well as its adaptations—continues to fascinate people today. This course will ask students not only to analyze Austen’s novels but also to consider the ways that more recent writers, producers, directors, and content creators have used her work.

This course fulfills the Literature Capstone requirement, meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors, and meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

ENG 4934
Senior Seminar in Literature: Black Sexualities: Intimacies Across Race and Time
L. Lamar Wilson
llwilson@fsu.edu

How have American chattel slavery and the racist views necessary to perpetuate its remnants into the Jim Crow era indelibly marked African Americans as queer objects of desire and masochistic violence? How might we begin to investigate queerness not only in literature that addresses LGBTQ experiences directly but also those that expose the ways that Eurocentric fictions about black masculinity and femininity queer even ostensibly heterosexual experiences? The philosophies and criticism of Hortense Spillers, Cheryl I. Harris, E. Patrick Johnson, Sharon Holland, and others will empower us to engage these two focal questions and devise our own paths of inquiry and research as we (re?)read canonical texts such as The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1845), Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), Jean Toomer’s Cane (1923), Nella Larsen’s Passing (1929), Toni Morrison’s Sula (1973) alongside important works such as Gayl Jones’s Corregidora (1975), Octavia Butler’s Dawn (1987), Gloria Naylor’s Bailey’s Cafe (1992), Randall Kenan’s Let the Dead Bury Their Dead (1992) and genre-bending poetic gems from this century, including Robin Coste Lewis's National Book Award-winning Voyage of the Sable Venus (2015), Kyle Dargan’s Honest Engine (2015), and Chet'la Sebree’s Mistress (2019), and Claude McKay’s recently discovered and published Renaissance novel, Romance in Marseille.

This course fulfills the Literature Capstone requirement and meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

ENG 4934
Senior Seminar in Literature: Reading Dylan: The Poetry of Bob Dylan
Course Pre-Requisites: Ninety semester hours of college work. Understanding how poetry works, an understanding of American history, and an interest in independent research.
S. E. Gontarski
sgontarski@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm- 2:35 pm, WMS 108

Dylan Studies (which now has its own Institute and archive located at the University of Tulsa) is at a turning point. Dylan is being taken seriously (Nobel Prize in Literature under his belt) as an artist whose work echoes the depth and breadth of other American Nobel Laurates such as Eugene O’Neil, William Faulkner , Ernest Hemingway and Toni Morrison. The nature of this turning point will be determined by the way the Dylan Archive (a huge unplumbed collection spanning draft manuscripts, studio session recordings, concert recording, and more) is used and will necessitate all sorts of methodologies "proper" to literary study being brought to bear upon Dylan's work. Dylan -- as Beckett once was -- is understood in widely read works like Christopher Ricks' Dylan's Visions of Sin (2003) as a "poet" engaged with the timeless verities of the human experience. Dylan's unique contribution to American literature, politics, and history (through his focus on essential American vexations such as race, as below) are almost completely absent from Dr. Ricks' study, however. This class advances an essential intervention into the typical, well-worn scholarly and popular readings of Dylan's work. Albums like the 1997's Time Out of Mind are crucial: it was with this album that Dylan retooled his songwriting method to incorporate obvious and hidden textual appropriations: the dialectical movement between "riffing" on well-known blues tropes and subtly reincorporating and rearranging language from obscure sources reveals an artist fully immersed in American history, and a songwriter eager to remake the by now cliched version of "Bob Dylan" tied up with broad narratives of the 1960s.

Foci:

Race (including White Supremacy),
Sex (i.e., Gender and Difference),
Religion (i.e., Salvation and Redemption),
Violence (Murder in particular).

This course fulfills the Literature Capstone requirement and meets the Scholarship in Practice (s) requirement for Liberal Studies.

ENG 4938
Honors Seminar: Rhetoric of Human Rights
Tarez Samra Graban
tgraban@fsu.edu
WMS 117

This course invites students to read, analyze, write about, and reconstruct cross-cultural spectacles and human rights events. Organized around a series of case studies, the course asks students to explore a variety of modes and forms—including hypertext, trauma narratives, testimonials, essays, archives, memorials, and graphic novels—gaining insight into how individuals, groups, and nations enact their human-rights interests from both local and global points of view. Case studies will be wide-ranging and may include past and present activism; vibrant cultural heritage projects, such as Kantha Threads (Bangladesh) and Art Against Apartheid (South Africa); and the annual St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs, to name only a few. Together, we will ask and answer the following questions: How can we interpret cross-cultural spectacles and human rights events when they occur in such a wide range of modalities (e.g., written, oral, visual, gestural, spatial, multimodal)? How can we be, do, or live differently after witnessing these spectacles—especially if they relate to cultures and crises that are not our own? How can we think critically about human rights discourse while we are also participating with this discourse in the real world? Students will present their original work during a mini-conference at the semester’s end.

ENL 3210
Medieval Literature in Translation
Peter Waldman
pw17c@my.fsu.edu
MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm, WMS 114

ENL 3210 is a survey course designed to introduce undergraduate students to the literature of the European Middle Ages. Course content includes a diverse range of literary and cultural artifacts. The course material aims to encompass the full breadth of the medieval period, covering texts originally written in both Old and Middle English as well as French and Italian, although all texts will be read translated into modern English. We will begin with an exploration of Anglo-Saxon texts, including Beowulf, the Dream of the Rood, and Elene, which we will study in terms of their contributions to both epic poetry and penitential material. We will then move into a study of Arthurian literature such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and selections from Le Morte d’Arthur, which in turn will lead us into a discussion of literary tropes such as the Loathly Lady which have persisted throughout the medieval period and beyond. Our final major unit will begin with an examination of Geoffrey Chaucer’s writings. These will include selections from the Canterbury Tales and some of his dream poetry, including the Parliament of Fowls and the House of Fame. Apart from these overarching topics, we will examine writings from other areas of medieval Europe, including Marie de France’s Bisclavret and the Inferno from Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. Our classes will be structured as instructor-led discussions with intermittent lecture on necessary context. The course will culminate with an interpretive research paper on a medieval text of the student’s choosing.

This course satisfies the Pre-1800 distribution requirement.

ENL 3334
Intro to Shakespeare
Chiyon Yu
cy18b@my.fsu.edu
MWF 4:50 pm – 5:40 pm, WMS 110

This class is designed to increase your enjoyment and understanding of Shakespeare’s work through a close reading of the texts in relation to their social and historical settings of the Renaissance or the early modern period in England. Throughout the semester, we will cover four dramatic genres of Shakespeare’s texts¬—comedy, history, tragedy, romance—and one poetic genre—sonnet. In addition to Shakespeare’s texts, we will also read his contemporaneous writers’ prose narratives used by Shakespeare as source materials and watch modern performances of Shakespeare’s work. With these materials in different media, we will also discuss how a text could be transmediated from prose narratives to dramatic texts, and then to dramatic performances on stage and on film.

This class will be based on class discussions, so students are expected to read assigned texts before coming to class and participate in class discussions. Throughout the semester, students will be required to write weekly response papers, a close reading essay, and a final research paper.

This class meets the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

ENL 4112
Eighteenth-Century Novel
Susan Candace Ward
candace.ward@fsu.edu
M/W 6:35pm - 7:50pm, WMS 201

“I can go no farther. The affair is over. Clarissa lives.” (Lovelace to Belford)

The eighteenth century has long been identified by literary historians as the Age of the Novel; the works of Samuel Richardson have long been identified as foundational to the rise of that genre, influencing future novelists from the Marquis de Sade, to Jane Austen, to Virginia Woolf, to Vladimir Nabakov, to Toni Morrison. In this course, we are going to read ONE of the century’s most influential and compelling works of fiction: Richardson’s Clarissa; or, The History of a Young Lady. Consisting of a series of 537 (!) letters between four main correspondents (Clarissa Harlowe, her best friend Anna Howe, the villain Robert Lovelace, and his confident John Belford), this work encompasses a host of contemporary issues that remain central to our 21st-century conceptions of identity: constructions of gender and sexuality; definitions of “virtue” and “honesty”; distinctions between the public and private; formations of class consciousness; imbalances of power; notions of liberty and free will. As importantly, by emphasizing the physical and psychological contests between Clarissa and Lovelace, the novel dramatizes the violent constraints imposed against assertions of the self. Over the course of the 16-week semester, we will explore all of these issues and the overarching conditions that led to the production and circulation of eighteenth-century novels like Clarissa. We will read Richardson’s work alongside relevant works of secondary criticism.

This course meets the pre-1800 and Genre requirements for LMC majors.

ENL 4161
Renaissance Drama
Boehrer
bboehrer@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am-11:00 am, WMS 110

A study of the English Renaissance drama contemporary with (but distinct from) Shakespeare, with emphasis upon Marlowe, Jonson, and Middleton. Two in-class presentations and a term paper will be required. We will concentrate on close reading techniques and historical context.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

ENL 4220
Renaissance Poetry and Prose: The Birth of Modernity
Pablo Maurette
pmaurette@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am-11 am, WMS 0121B

This course explores the period between roughly 1350 and 1650 as the beginning of modernity. The Renaissance, or early modernity, is a period marked by five major cultural revolutions: the rediscovery of Classical culture, the invention of the printing press, the discovery of the New World, the reformation, and the birth of modern science. All of these revolutions take place as human beings start thinking of themselves and their relationship to nature and to the divine in radical new ways. The way we think of humanity and its role in the universe, the ways in which we conceive science and religion were in many ways modeled in this period. The course will be looking at some of the most interesting transnational examples of poetry and prose of the time. We will work with fictional and non-fictional works written originally in Latin and English, French and Spanish, Italian and German. In authors as diverse and influential as Thomas More, Christine de Pizan, William Shakespeare, Miguel de Cervantes, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Michel de Montaigne, Margaret Cavendish, Pico della Mirandola and others, we will find new notions of mankind and its role and place in the world, of science as a secular and anti-dogmatic endeavor, and of religion as a moral and spiritual enterprise.

This course meets the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

ENL 4230
Restoration / 18th-century British Lit
Susan Candace Ward
candace.ward@fsu.edu
M/W 3:05pm - 4:20pm, WMS 319

This course is intended to introduce you to major works and figures of British literature from 1660 to 1800. Alongside poetry, prose, and drama, we will examine non-literary texts that, like the literature, reflected and produced the cultures of eighteenth-century Britain. In this course, we will examine the rise of British colonialism and Atlantic slavery and the numerous revolutions that occurred over the century—from the financial revolution that sparked the rise of British capitalism and the Industrial Revolution, to the political revolutions in America, France, and Haiti, to the cultural revolutions of “minds and manners” that marked, according to most British subjects, the “progress of civilization.” As we track the significance of historical, political, economic, and gender-related issues of the period, we will also learn about some of the critical approaches to eighteenth-century studies, and discuss how these methods of inquiry are relevant to other areas of literary studies and to our lives outside the classroom.

Throughout the semester, you will be called on to discuss these texts and write about them in papers and on exams. In order to successfully fulfill the paper and exam requirements, you must demonstrate not only a familiarity with the texts and contexts (i.e., background information provided in lectures, class discussions, and independent research), but also an ability to communicate your ideas by applying the critical and analytical techniques used in literary and cultural studies today.

This course meets the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

ENL 4333
Shakespeare
Bruce Boehrer
WMS 112A bboehrer@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm-2:35 pm, WMS 121B

An advanced study of selected plays and nondramatic verse by Shakespeare. This course will focus on in-depth reading of four plays: (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, King Lear, and Macbeth), with particular attention to environmental relations. Two in-class presentations and a term paper are required.

This course meets the pre-1800 requirement for LMC majors.

IDS 2375
Third World Cinema
Robin Goodman (TA, Daniel Raschke)
rgoodman@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20 pm-2:35 pm with 3:05-6:05 film screenings, DHA 103

In 1969, Fernando Solanas and Octavio Getino coined the phrase “Third Cinema” to mark the emergence of a new aesthetic in filmmaking. Their manifesto, “Towards a Third Cinema,” reimagines film as a revolutionary praxis and revolution itself as requiring a new aesthetic that uses the techniques of the European avant-garde, documentary, Soviet experimentation, and the narrative forms of Hollywood. This course considers some of the products of what became a movement in cinema and what kinds of filmmaking it inspired in its aftermath, asking questions about the relationships between aesthetic form, narrative content, and politics. Films may include classics like Battle of Algiers, Black Girl, Los Olvidados, The Hour of the Furnaces (La hora de los hornos), and The World of Apu but also less well-known films like an exemplar of Brazilian Cinema Novo Vidas secas (Barren Lives) and a feminist film from the Iranian New Wave, At Five in the Afternoon. In this course, we will study great cinema from Latin America, to the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Some of the required viewing for this class includes disturbing images.

This course meets the Diversity and Genre requirements for LMC majors and the Ethics, Humanities and Cultural Practice, and Cross-Cultural Studies (x) requirement for Liberal Studies.

IDS 2455
The Role of the Public Intellectual
David Kirby
dkirby@fsu.edu
M 3:05 pm-6:05 pm, 114 WMS

This course examines the role of the public intellectual. The assignments will differ every term, but typically students read, discuss, and write about texts by such authors as George Orwell, Albert Camus, Susan Sontag, Camille Paglia, Greil Marcus, and Cornell West in order to: (1) encounter ideas to which they have not yet been exposed, (2) become aware of their own heightened ability to work with big ideas and communicate them, and (3) identify a road map for their own progress toward becoming a public intellectual.

IDS 3457
The Reel Middle Ages: Medieval Literature and Film
David Johnson
djohnson@fsu.edu

L.P. Hartley’s 1953 novel The Go-Between famously opens with the sentence, “The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.” To what extent is this true? One of the chief aims of this course will be to explore whether this is a view shared by those who produced filmic versions of medieval literature in the 20th and 21st centuries. This is a course about adaptation, medievalism and the “Reel Middle Ages.” We will examine a body of medieval texts in their literary and cultural contexts, analyzing their reception and re-interpretation through the contemporary medium of film. We will learn about the theory and practice of film adaptation in general, and the transformation of medieval texts to film in particular. The complexity of our modern period’s medieval heritage requires much effort on our part to appreciate. This course attempts to facilitate a deeper appreciation and understanding of 20th- and 21st-century medievalism in one of our most influential media. The course is divided into three units, the first of which consists of an introduction to adaptation studies and adaptation theory, as well as medievalism and the medieval imaginary. The rest of that first unit and the remaining two units will each be devoted to a particular topic of filmic medievalism: the Old English epic poem Beowulf, the legends of King Arthur, and Robin Hood. We will be reading primary texts on those topics and watching one relevant adaptation each week.

LIT 2000
Introduction to Literature
Jannah Mitchell
jmitchell9@fsu.edu
MWF 10:40 am-11:30 am, WMS 0108

This course serves as an introduction to reading and understanding literature. The novels we will read in this course focus on familial relationships in the lives of girls and young women. As we discuss and point out the formal elements of literature present in each novel, we will also discuss the importance of these relationships in the young girl’s life as she comes of age. We will question: How are girls and young women influenced by these relationships in their lives? Ultimately, how do these relationships aid in the growth of the girl/young woman as she comes of age? Course texts include: Salvage the Bones (Jesmyn Ward), The Color Purple (Alice Walker), Dominicana (Angie Cruz), and A Thousand Splendid Suns (Khaled Hosseini).

LIT 2000
Introduction to Literature: Order v. Chaos
Iain Grinbergs
igrinbergs@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 4:50 pm-6:05 pm, WMS 0114

This introductory course is not for the faint of heart. We’ll explore works spawned from the tension between order and chaos, delving into issues such as abnormal psychology, monstrosity, and more. Boundaries will be blurred. In the first half of the semester, we’ll analyze poetry, short stories, and folktales. In the second half, we’ll examine Miss Lonelyhearts (novella), Frankenstein (novel), Equus (drama), and their movie adaptations. Major assignments include two papers, a midterm exam, and a final exam.

LIT 2010
Intro to Fiction
Kate Kimball
kkimball@fsu.edu
Section .0001 Tu/Th 3:05 pm-4:20 pm, DIF 236

This is an introductory course to long form fiction—novels and collections of linked short stories. We will be looking at place and how place can displace a character or empower a character and affect construction of identity. We will look at a large range of place-based fiction, both historical and contemporary. Among others, some of the texts we will study are Wuthering Heights, Lost in the City, Salvage the Bones, and Blindness.

LIT 2010
Intro to Fiction
Kate Kimball
kkimball@fsu.edu
Section .0002 Tu/Th 4:50 pm-6:05 pm, WMS 121

This is an introductory course to long form fiction—novels and collections of linked short stories. We will be looking at place and how place can displace a character or empower a character and affect construction of identity. We will look at a large range of place-based fiction, both historical and contemporary. Among others, some of the texts we will study are Wuthering Heights, Lost in the City, Salvage the Bones, and Blindness.

LIT 2030
Intro to Poetry: An Exploration of Poetry as Politics, Prescription, and Periscope
Alexa Doran
WMS 428 aed16e@fsu.edu
12 pm-12:50 pm, WMS 225

In “Intro to Poetry: An Exploration of Poetry as Politics, Pop Culture, and Periscope” we will engage with a diverse set of poets (including Claudia Rankine, Terrence Hayes, and Anna B. Sutton), forms, critics, and subgenres of poetry in order to work toward a meaningful understanding of the role of poets and poetry in our current culture. Students should expect to read, review, analyze, and compose poetry in this course.

LIT 3024
Perspective on Short Story
Jeannine Ortega
jeo17@fsu.edu
Section: .0002: Tu/Th 8 am to 9:15 am, WMS 0121

This course will provide an overview of the short story genre by focusing not only on different elements that construct a short story – such as form, narrative voice, plot, setting, conflict, characters, and so on – but also engaging in thoughtful discussion of these stories in connection with history, politics, race, class, gender and sexuality, and other topics. The first half of the course will focus on teaching students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students will be encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works we read based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text. The second half of the course will examine genres which do not conform to conventional elements, such as the subgenres within the realm of speculative fiction. We will look at dystopian short stories to examine different forms of alterity, or otherness, and the way fiction allows us to examine, approach, and analyze it. This class will require active engagement in class discussions, presentations, and close reading and analysis, among other reading and writing activities.

This course meets the Cross-Cultural Studies (x) requirement for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3024
Perspective on Short Story
Jeannine Ortega
jeo17@fsu.edu
Section: .0003 Tu/Th 9:45 am to 11:00 am, WMS 0317

This course will provide an overview of the short story genre by focusing not only on different elements that construct a short story – such as form, narrative voice, plot, setting, conflict, characters, and so on – but also engaging in thoughtful discussion of these stories in connection with history, politics, race, class, gender and sexuality, and other topics. The first half of the course will focus on teaching students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students will be encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works we read based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text. The second half of the course will examine genres which do not conform to conventional elements, such as the subgenres within the realm of speculative fiction. We will look at dystopian short stories to examine different forms of alterity, or otherness, and the way fiction allows us to examine, approach, and analyze it. This class will require active engagement in class discussions, presentations, and close reading and analysis, among other reading and writing activities.

This course meets the Cross-Cultural Studies (x) requirement for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3043
Modern Drama: Modern Irish Drama
Adam Pickens
awp18c@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 6:35 pm-7:50 pm, WMS 0317

Any attempt to survey the entirety of modern drama as a whole is bound to come up woefully short. This is largely true of attempting to take the long view of any one type of media over the broadly one hundred plus years that we categorize as “modern.” This course chooses to introduce students to the world of modern drama via a specific area within that field: modern Irish drama. Of the reasons for this perhaps the most important is that Irish drama has maintained a level of cultural significance both inside and outside of the small island while the cultural dominance of drama in most western countries has waned over the years. This course will therefore examine several Irish dramatists starting with the Irish literary revival of the late 1800s through to the present day. This course will examine authors such as Lady Gregory, Yeats, O’Casey, O’Neill, Behan, Beckett, and more. In looking at these authors and their texts in combination with secondary materials, students will chart the shifts in the dramatic landscape that have occurred since the beginnings of modern drama with attention to politics, poetics, language, the Avant Garde, sexuality, violence, and national identity.

LIT 3112
Understanding Literary History I
Coldiron
acoldiron@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am-12:50 pm, on Zoom

This course builds your knowledge of literary history and your skills of literary analysis. Fulfills an LMC Gateway/core requirement. THIS SECTION IS ONLINE/SYNCHRONOUS (class meets on Zoom). REQUIREMENTS: all technologies listed at https://distance.fsu.edu/student-guide. We survey literature composed in English, from roughly the 7th century CE (the date of the oldest extant poem in Old English, "Caedmon's Hymn") to 1798 (the date of the manifesto in the Preface to Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads). Focusing on genre, form, technique, and socio-historical contexts (including transnational contexts), we will seek both a broad, "big picture" view of 1,000 years of earlier English literary history and a "close reading" view of particular authors and works that form the broader survey.

This course fulfills a core course requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 3112
Understanding Literary History I: From Beowulf to Boswell
Terri Bourus
terri.bourus@fsu.edu
M 3:05 pm-6:05 pm, WMS 0120

This course will introduce you to the vibrant tradition of literature written in Britain from its earliest origins in the heroic Anglo-Saxon period up through the cosmopolitan close of the eighteenth century. Throughout the semester, we will cover more than a thousand years of literary history. We begin with the earliest written literature of our own language, the epic works of Old English, before exploring the magic of Middle English romance, the world-changing drama of the Early Modern English stage, and the modern globalism of the eighteenth century. The goals of this course are twofold: first, to introduce you to the central texts and authors that make up the first “half” (by volume, not by time period) of the corpus of literature written in Britain, and second, to demonstrate the continuity of the British literary tradition as a thriving expression of the social and cultural conditions of its time.

This course fulfills a core course requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 3124
Understanding Literary History II
John Ribó
jribo@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am - 11:00 am, WMS 0201

This course—the second of two literary history courses required for Literature, Media, and Culture majors—surveys literature written in English from the turn of the nineteenth century to the present. Our readings will feature a broad selection of short stories, novels, plays, poems, and essays highlighting major figures and movements of British and American literature. Throughout the semester special attention will be paid to how writers interrogate, subvert, expand, and renew literary traditions to reflect changing ethical and aesthetic values. In the process, students will be encouraged to reflect critically on canon formation. What stories merit being told? Who gets to tell those stories? How do they tell them? To what end?

This course fulfills a core course requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 3124
Understanding Literary History II
Cynie Cory
ccory@fsu.edu
MWF 12:00 pm-12:50 pm, WMS 0108

This course examines a smorgasbord of Anglican writers in a variety of genres and considerations from the Romantic period to the present. In this version of LIT 3124 we will discuss varying approaches to writing and reading, including the ways in which the surveyed authors break from conventions of form and style. We will also study authors who experimented outside the margins. Students are required to dialogue with the authors’ work and participate in inquiry. For instance, to what extent is it possible to disengage our twenty-first century sensibility when we approach a nineteenth century text? How can we bridge the gap between two centuries? What are the ways that allow us to enter a text? In what ways does literature matter? Together we will chew on questions such as these while we explore the artistic and historical movements in the survey of literature from roughly 1800 to the present.

This course fulfills a core course requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 3313
Science Fiction: The Worlding of Science Fiction
Alexander Ruhsenberger
acr17c@my.fsu.edu
MW – 4:50 – 6:05PM, WMS 319

This course will cover some of the classics of the Science Fiction genre (Asimov, Heinlein, Le Guin, Dick, Butler) as well as many contemporaries (Gibson, Miéville, Jemisin) through short story, novel, TV, film, and video game mediums in order to understand how various writers and creators of the genre create and build fantastic worlds. “Worlding” will be a key term in this course and will be the primary tool for how students will analyze Science Fiction. By thinking about worlding, this course will focus on various literary techniques that shape not only a work of science fiction, but also the political possibilities in our collective imagination. This course will also branch out into the various sub-genres of Science Fiction, like cyberpunk, steampunk, biopunk, speculative, and will also include some Fantasy. This course will pay close attention to the types of worlds that form at various historical moments. For example, why does a utopian Star Trek come about in the late 1960s? Why does Cyberpunk emerge as a sub-genre in Reagan's hyper-capitalist 1980s? Furthermore, the course will also focus on postcolonial struggles in Science Fiction, and the authors who challenged the genre’s colonialist conventions. The course will pay close attention to how marginalized authors shifted and changed the various narratives and politics of the worlds portrayed in Science Fiction.

This course meets the Genre requirement LMC majors and the Cross-Cultural Studies requirement (x) for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3313
Science Fiction: Science Fictional Worlds and the Worlding of Science Fiction
Frances Tran
ftran@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 9:45 am – 11:00 am, WMS 108

Mutants, robots, zombies, and other super- or non-human beings abound in popular literature and media today. Recognizing the resonance of science fiction (SF) in our contemporary moment, this course explores the historical, cultural, and critical genealogies of this genre. We will discuss how SF unsettles normative conceptions of time, space, and embodiment and, in doing so, prompts readers to grapple with questions about changing conceptions of the “human,” alternative configurations of race, gender, and sexuality, the contradictions of technology, and the possibilities of social justice in the present. This course therefore invites students not only to analyze the construction of science fictional worlds in literature and popular culture, but also to examine the worlding of science fiction, that is, the multiple identities through which it shapes our shared cultural landscape—as a genre, a marketing tag, a set of reading protocols, as the opposite of realism, as a type of realism, as a theoretical framework, and activist praxis. We will engage a range of cultural texts, including short stories, novels, film, and comics that capture the many different forms SF assumes and the breadth of the timespaces, dimensions, and worlds it opens up.

This course meets the Genre requirement LMC majors and the Cross-Cultural Studies requirement (x) for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3383
Women in Literature: Vesuvius at Home
Natalie Tombasco
nt19f@my.fsu.edu
Tu/Th 4:50 pm - 6:05 pm, WMS 201

This course examines the role of women in literary studies, both as authors and muses, to consider the question: where is a woman’s place? In doing so, we will “dwell in [the] Possibilit[ies]” of the domestic sphere, as well as follow the Female Flâneur into distant (and near) geographies. By traversing narrative modes of stillness and mobility from Victorian writers (“Angels in the House”) into the 21st century, we will engage with issues of identity—race, gender, class, and sexuality—as well as topics of belonging, grief, motherhood, the occult, and transformation. Writers of study will be Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Marianne Moore, Gertrude Stein, Elizabeth Bishop, Toni Morrison, and Lauren Groff. How does She, in these various places, time periods, and genres, step away from the male tradition and create a language of her own?

This course meets the diversity requirement for LMC majors and the Diversity in Western Experience (y) and Writing (w) requirements for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3383
Women in Literature
Holly Horner
hh15c@my.fsu.edu
Tu/Th 8:00 am-9:15 am, WMS 319

This course guides students through a rigorous study of Romantic-era British literature with a concentration on female novelists. The nineteenth century saw the rise of the Industrial Revolution, rapid expansion of the printing press, and the beginning conversations about women’s rights and the abolition of slavery in the British colonies. The scholarly field of Romanticism is currently undergoing its own revolution that is best encapsulated by the #Bigger6 philosophy that espouses “antiracist & anticolonial work in global 18th-/19th-C. lit & their long (after)lives. We undiscipline romanticism, build from it rather than within it.” This course strives to adhere to this philosophy as we engage in meaningful conversations about how these women writers contend with English nationalism, imperialism, and racism.

Our core texts offer a unique perspective on how white women writers in the nineteenth century contend with race and colonization during the heyday of the British Empire’s control of foreign nations. In many cases, these writers are just as culpable as their male contemporaries with perpetuating the nineteenth century’s racist, classist, and sexist culture, even if they are trying to signal their “wokeness” and appear sympathetic towards marginalized figures and communities. Instead of defaulting to the "they were a product of their time" position, our course will interrogate how these writers portrayed these important social problems in the nineteenth century and how they are echoed in our current context.

This course meets the diversity requirement for LMC majors and the Diversity in Western Experience (y) and Writing (w) requirements for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3383
Women in Literature: Women and Modernism
Patrick Imburgia
pwi18@my.fsu.edu
MWF 1:20 pm-2:10 pm, WMS 0319

As authors and publishers, women significantly shaped the modernist movement. Writers such as Virginia Woolf, Mina Loy, and Gertrude Stein challenged traditional notions of aesthetics in their novels and poetry. Simultaneously, the concept of the “New Woman,” arising in the late 19th century and gaining popularity during the first half of the 20th, worked to disrupt the traditional limitations imposed upon women by a male-dominated society. This course will focus most centrally on questions of gender and modernism; our task might be articulated by Rita Felski’s questions, “How would our understanding of modernity change if instead of taking male experience as paradigmatic, we were to look instead at texts written primarily by or about women? And what if feminine phenomena, often seen as having a secondary or marginal status, were given a central importance in the analysis of the culture of modernity?” Among other things, we will consider women writers’ relationship to language and form; to history, political engagement, war and violence, land/nation, structures of power, education, art, and the everyday; to the body and sexuality; to models of selfhood, the psyche, and voice; and to one another.

This course meets the diversity requirement for LMC majors and the Diversity in Western Experience (y) and Writing (w) requirements for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3383
Women in Literature: Sex, Work, and Sex Work
Eleanor Boudreau
eboudreau@fsu.edu
MWF 9:20 am-10:10 am

This course examines women in a variety of professional roles, from running for president to becoming a prostitute. Readings will span multiple genres, including nonfiction, fiction, poetry, music, film, and more. Along the way, students will encounter a wide range of authors, including (but not limited to) Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Virginia Woolf, Audre Lorde, Anne Carson, Cathy Park Hong, and Carmen Maria Machado. Additionally, we will examine representations of women working on stage and screen, in songs, and in commercial advertisements. As well as weekly readings and response assignments, students will complete two short close reading papers, a critical comparison of two course texts, and a final project on a text (or texts) of their choosing.

This course meets the diversity requirement for LMC majors and the Diversity in Western Experience (y) and Writing (w) requirements for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3438
Literature and Medicine: Diseases and Debates, Then and Now
Meegan (Margaret) Kennedy Hanson
mkhanson@fsu.edu
asynchronous online course

Courses in Literature and Medicine often study how literary texts address questions in medical ethics and public health. In Literature and Medicine: Diseases and Debates, students will read a selection of brief essays, fiction, poetry, and other texts from the 19th century alongside critical and historical work from today’s medical landscape, in order to understand the roots of contemporary medical debates and how they have changed over time. These controversies helped shape the landscape of medical ethics. We will compare, for example, how questions around anesthesia, patient privacy, or contagion play out “then and now.” This course builds skills in critical reading and writing, cultural practice, and ethics.

We’ll examine illness as metaphor; the art and science of medicine; the rise of medical realism, objectivity and authority; the roles of the physician, nurse, and patient; the meaning of patient privacy and consent; medical professionalism and alternative medicine; food adulteration, nutrition; disability rights; prosthetics and the integrity of the body; pain, anesthetics, and drug use; and the “good death.” The “COVID edition” of the course revises and expands our discussion of epidemiology, sanitary reform, epidemics, and personal vs. public health.

We will focus on literary, cultural, and ethical analysis in social and historical context. Students will complete one analytic and one personal (creative) essay response to the debates we study. This course will also help students prepare for the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skill section of the MCAT.

This course meets the Ethics and Humanities/Cultural Practice requirements and Writing (w) requirements for Liberal Studies.

LIT 3524
LGBTQ Drama: 20th- and 21st-Century U.S. LGBTQ Drama and Performance
Carla Della Gatta
cdellagatta@fsu.edu
M/W 3:05 pm – 4:20 pm, WMS 204

This course considers the genre of LGBTQ Theatre that encompasses dramatic literature, theatre, performance sites, theory, narrative traditions, and themes. The course will focus on theatre and drama written and produced by and for the LGBTQ community in the United States from the last one hundred years. We will address how representations of the LGBTQ community began to change in the 1960s and became prominent in the 1980s and 90s, interweaving influences from theatre history and cultural and political histories across the impact of the Stonewall Riots, the AIDS Crisis, and human rights initiatives. How has changing terminology and visibility affected depictions of LGBTQ characters? How do activism, allyship, and advocacy function in LGBTQ drama and performance? What is the relationship of aesthetics, structure, and language to the genre of LGBTQ Theatre? Plays and films will include works by Tanya Barfield, Ty Defoe, Hannah Gadsby, Virginia Grise, David Henry Hwang, Larry Kramer, Tony Kushner, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Brian Sherman, and Paula Vogel. Readings from gender, sexuality, and queer theory will accompany readings of primary texts.

This course meets the Diversity and Genre requirements for LMC majors.

LIT 4033
Modern Poetry: “Call it locusts. / Call it me.”
Eleanor Boudreau
eboudreau@fsu.edu
MWF 10:40 am-11:30 am

This course explores the fascinating, if fraught, territory of what it means to be “modern” and what it means to be “poetry” in the twentieth century by investigating the inception and influence of the modernism. First, we will situate modernist poetry culturally and historically. Second, we will come to understand modernist poetry aesthetically by investigating tone, difficulty, and form. Third, we will combine our understanding of history and aesthetics to examine issues of power, sexuality, gender, and race. Finally, we will ask if the modernist movement ever ended? And if so, when and how? This last unit will examine debates about the definitions of “modernism” and “modern.” Along the way, students will encounter many of the most influential poets writing in English in the twentieth century, including (but not limited to) Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, and Langston Hughes. As well as weekly readings and response assignments, students will complete two short close reading papers, a critical comparison of two course poems, and a final project on modern poems of their choosing.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4033
Modern Poetry: Modernist Poetry in the American Grain
Andrew Epstein
aepstein@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 am-12:50 am, WMS 318

This course provides students with a firm grounding in modernism and modern American poetry. It will also give you the skills necessary to read, understand, enjoy, and write about poetry in general. We will engage in a comprehensive investigation of the major figures, movements, and innovative styles in modern American poetry, as we move from its roots in the 19th century (Whitman and Dickinson) to the mid-20th century. The course will pay special attention to ongoing debates about the definition and nature of “modernism”; to situating the poetry within its cultural and historical context; to issues of gender, race, and the dialogue between poetry and politics; and to modern poetry’s relationship with other developments in the arts, such as modern painting.

Our in-depth study of the major American modernist poets will stress the central role of experimentation and avant-garde poetics within the American tradition. Throughout, we will consider the perennial question that has long concerned both poets and critics: what, if anything, is distinctively American about American poetry? How do poets respond to the tumultuous cultural and political upheavals of the 20th century? How do these poets develop new forms in order to capture the experience of everyday life in the modern world? Poets we will study include many of the most influential modern American poets, including Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Mina Loy, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, and Robert Frost.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4034
Postmodern and Contemporary Poetry: American Poetry Since 1945
Andrew Epstein
aepstein@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 3:05 pm-4:50 pm, WMS 108

This course will provide students with a firm grounding in the major figures, movements, and innovations in American poetry since World War II. We will pay special attention to the rich period from the 1950s to the 1970s, as we focus on such topics as the postwar reaction to modernism and to the New Criticism, the conflict between closed and open forms, the turn to the self, the development of a poetics of everyday life, and the tension between individuals and literary movements. We will discuss how contemporary poetry grapples with issues related to gender, race, and the dialogue between poetry and politics, and will situate the poetry within the cultural climate and politics of Cold War America, the 1960s and beyond. As we trace the roots and development of postmodernist American poetry, we will explore how and why these poets invent new, unconventional literary methods to address changing ideas about the nature of the self, language and literature, racial and sexual identity, and America itself, in a world undergoing dramatic transformations. Poets discussed will likely include Allen Ginsberg, Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch, Robert Hayden, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, Carolyn Forché, and Yusef Komunyakaa.

This course meets the Genre requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4184
Irish Literature: Irish Film--A Different Ireland: at Home and Abroad
S. E. Gontarski
sgontarski@fsu.edu
Tu / Th 3:05 pm -4:20 pm, WMS 319

The Irish writer, Samuel Beckett (whose film we will study), liked to tell the story in which the nations of the world are asked to write an essay on “The Camel.” The Frenchman’s was called “The Camel and Love”; the German’s was “The Camel and Metaphysics”: the Irishman’s “The Camel and the fight for Irish Freedom.” Such then is the nature of the Irish ethos and sensibility, the Irish preoccupation if not obsession for some 700 years. But what happened once that independence was attained? What kind of nation did the Irish make themselves into once they were free of British oversight and regulation? We examine such issues on the 100th anniversary of Irish independence (of sorts) in 1922.

We need to keep in mind as well that Ireland is still, after more than 100 years of independence, a work in progress, a nation still trying to define what it means to be Irish. Are the Irish those that live within the borders of what is now considered Ireland. Does one need to have been born within those bounds to be considered Irish? Is there a religious test to Irishness? And what of the six counties that were part of historic Ireland but are still under British rule, the territory called Northern Ireland. Or what of the Irish diaspora, the scattering of the Irish all across the world at least since the mid nineteenth century famine. Are they Irish, or hyphenated Irish: Australian-Irish, Canadian, Irish, Irish-American. In what order should the compound be stated? These are some of the issues we will try to grapple with this term through the explorations of Irish filmmakers.

LIT 4205
Literature of Human Rights
Trinyan Mariano
tmariano@fsu.edu

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach, bringing law, literature, critical theory, history, and media studies together in order to study the evolving nature and problems of human rights, especially the problems of violence and representation. We will explore and question the foundation and implementation of human rights across history, as configured by literary and visual media, and interrogate the role, for better and worse, that literary and visual representation have on the ethical and political world. We will aim to examine critically the meaning, relevance, and legacy of human rights discourse in dealing with major social and political issues. At the forefront is the thorny question of the weight of the term human—what is it to be human? And how does that category act in both western and non-western traditions? Among our topics: speech rights, civil rights, torture, sexual rights, economic rights, memory, and reparations.

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4233
Anglophone Postcolonial Literature: History, Imagination, and the Postcolonial Novel
Robert Stilling
Tu/Th 4:50 pm-6:05pm, WMS 0108

In this course we will take a deep dive into four novels from Africa, Australia, and India that reimagine sweeping histories of first contact, colonization, national independence, and the speculative futures of postcolonial societies. The four novels we will read—Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie, That Deadman Dance, by Kim Scott, and The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell—are epic in their ambition. They range in style from realist, to lyric, to magic realist, to science fiction. They mix indigenous linguistic and folk traditions with European genre conventions and allegories of nationhood, highlighting the hybridity of postcolonial fiction in its attempt to tell more pluralistic versions of history to a range of sometimes conflicting audiences, native, Western, and Westernized. The readings are thrilling, inventive, demanding, and rewarding, and we will take our time with each. Assignments will emphasize deep engagement with each text, collaboration with your peers, historical research, and informal reflection, culminating in a final project that can take a number of forms.

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4329
African American Folklore
Jerrilyn McGregory
jmcgregory@fsu.edu

This course surveys the cultural landscape of African American folklore through the illumination of our contemporary era through the lens of hip hop culture. We will interrogate African American artistic expressions such as sacred music, folk cultural heroes, blues, foodways, and verbal art, including the dozens (popularly known as ‘yo mama’ jokes), etc. During the course of the semester, students will engage lessons in cultural pedagogy and learn to interpret African American folkloristics from an insiders’ perspective. By reading about and sampling African American folk culture, students will gain a hands-on experience with an enriching topic while experiencing AFAM folklore as a living tradition.

This course meets the Diversity requirement for LMC majors.

LIT 4534
Early Feminisms
Celia Caputi
celia.caputi@fsu.edu

A reading-intensive exploration of texts combatting masculinist hegemony and celebrating the dignity of the female sex, from the Middle Ages through the early twentieth century. Requirements: reading quizzes, participation, two 5-6 page research papers, creative/interdisciplinary project; final exam. Please note this course is HARD COPY ONLY and prohibits the use of personal electronic devices (lap-tops, e-readers, i-phones, etc) unless warranted by an ADA accommodation.