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Graduate Courses

AML 5027
Studies in US Literature since 1875: Law and Literature
Trinyan Mariano
tmariano@fsu.edu
W 3:05 p.m.-6:05 p.m.

The law “creates the social world,” the same social world, Pierre Bourdieu writes, “which first creates the law” (“The Force of Law” 839). The dialectic Bourdieu puts forward will provide us with a set of working assumptions—namely, that the social and material worlds we inhabit, engender, and maintain are inescapably normative and narrative, and, further, that neither history, nor literature, nor law can break free of the paths that have been plotted upon reality by our imaginations. It is, after all, from language, corpus, and myth that institutions, prescriptions, and ways of being-in-the-world are constructed. Accordingly, the primary intellectual focus of the class will be on the problematics of configuring the word and the world, the discursive and the coercive, the imaginary and the given. We will read really interesting theory, formal legal texts, and a lot of great, mostly American, fiction. You will read extensively, submit short response papers, take a turn leading discussion, and write a culminating seminar paper.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies (American).

AML 5296
Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature
John Ribó
jribo@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

This course examines multi-ethnic literature as a field of scholarship with a particular institutional history in the United States. To that end, we will research and learn about the emergence of The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) in 1973. What literary works, scholarly questions, and historical circumstances shaped the founding of this organization and the journal it created? How did MELUS cultivate and shape studies of multi-ethnic literature in the U.S. and beyond? How have the organization, its journal, and the field evolved since their inception? What areas of multi-ethnic literary studies appear most promising and productive today? This survey of the history of the field will serve as the backdrop for the analysis of a wide variety of texts and media created by Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Asian American writers and artists. Close attention will be paid to intersections of class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and (dis)ability. In addition, the course will highlight quandaries raised by modernity/coloniality’s deep roots in settler colonialism and the transatlantic slave trade.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies (American); and Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies. This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Bob Shacocis
rshacochis@fsu.edu
M 6:35 p.m.-9:35 p.m.

This workshop emphasizes the development of the craft of fiction writing. Students are expected to work toward publication.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Skip Horack
WMS 438 shorack@fsu.edu
Th, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

CRW 5130 is a graduate workshop in fiction writing. This class will follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the intensive discussion of that work, will be our main focus. To that end, over the course of the semester students will be required to share at least three story-length manuscripts (one revision and two new pieces; novel excerpts are fine). This course assumes you have a very serious interest in fiction writing, as well as in discussing the writing of same with others likewise engaged. Our concerns are mainly practical and craft-based: where you as author wish to go with a particular draft, and how we, as readers and writers engaged in a common cause, might help you get there.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop
Virgil Suárez
vsuarez@fsu.edu
Tu 11:35 a.m.-2:35 p.m.

We will be workshopping your work in progress and helping you make your poems better through rigorous revision. The class has no reading list, but there will be texts recommended along the way as we make a diagnosis of your work in class.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop: The Long Line
L. Lamar Wilson
llwilson@fsu.edu
Th 11:35 a.m.-2:35 p.m.

In the first issue of The Prose Poem: An International Journal, editor Peter Johnson opined, “Just as black humor straddles the fine line between comedy and tragedy, so the prose poem plants one foot in prose, the other in poetry, both heels resting precariously on banana peels.” After surveying the work of innovators at the fin de siècle through the late 20th century (Rimbaud, James Weldon and Fenton Johnson, Stein, Neruda, Brooks, Bishop, Simic, Giovanni, et al.), we'll explore innovative contemporary collections that exploit the long line without falling flat. Poetic prose by Harryette Mullen, Erica Hunt, Oliver de la Paz, Claudia Rankine, Atsuro Riley, Layli Long Soldier, Tommy Pico, Taylor Johnson, and lyric essays on the line by James Longenbach, Alyson Miller, Ellen Bryant Voigt, and others will animate our discussions of our own poems.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5317
Article and Essay Workshop: Narrative Nonfiction
Diane Roberts
dkroberts@fsu.edu
W 6:35 p.m.-9:35 p.m.

We will read nonfiction, including pieces by Helen Macdonald, Samantha Irby, William Hazlitt, James Baldwin and others, but this course is primarily a workshop. Everyone writes; everyone reads; everyone acts as an editor for colleagues’ work. You will produce 20-30 pages of prose: stand-alone essays, linked short pieces, or some part of a larger work of narrative nonfiction. Whatever you write, I would hope you will try to publish it. Indeed, we will discuss how you pitch to journals, magazines, online sites, etc., as well as how to write a nonfiction book proposal.

I am not actively anti-memoir, but you’d better have a first-rate story and a new way of telling it. No matter what you write, you should, as we say in journalism, report it out. Base your work on facts, not just feelings. Having said that, your project is up to you. Grades will be based on the quality of your work, including discussion and revision. Rewriting is the real writing.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5720
Research Methods in Rhetoric & Composition
Elias Dominguez Barajas
edominguezbarajas@fsu.edu
Tu 1:20 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

The course is an introduction to research design and practice, the evaluation of research studies, and bibliographic resources for conducting research in rhetoric and composition. The research methods, methodologies, and epistemologies covered may often prove to be interdisciplinary, requiring the examination of theories and foundational concepts derived from other academic disciplines. The overarching goal of the course is to explore the major research paradigms in the field with the aims of examining how they construct knowledge, exposing their underlying assumptions, and probing their ethical implications.

Requirements: This course satisfies a core requirement in Rhetoric and Composition (MA and PhD programs).

ENG 5079
Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies: ‘It matters what thoughts think thoughts’
Frances Tran
ftran@fsu.edu
Th 1:20 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

This course takes as its point of departure Donna Haraway’s assertion in Staying with the Trouble that “It matters what thoughts think thoughts. It matters what knowledges know knowledges. It matters what relations relate relations. It matters what worlds world worlds. It matters what stories tell stories.” Admitting that “It matters” is to recognize the enormous privilege and possibilities of the work we do and the fields and conversations in which we are entering as scholars and teachers. As an introduction to contemporary practice in literary and cultural studies, this class invites us to engage with the history of ideas and the politics of knowledge production. We will ask questions such as: How do we define theory and what are the stakes of theoretical scholarship? How might engaging with different schools of thought and theoretical frameworks allow us to read literature more closely while also attuning us to the broader implications of interpretive acts? Addressing questions like these will help us elaborate how theory nuances our understanding of the structures of power, social hierarchies, norms, and narratives that organize what constitutes cherished notions of identity, belonging, home, and the human.

We will examine both foundational and contemporary theoretical texts from a range of discourses, including biopolitics, Black studies, gender and sexuality studies, ecocriticism, indigenous cosmologies, postcolonial theory, and more. In order to facilitate our discussion of these dense concepts and debates, we will analyze the theoretical selections alongside short literary readings and strive to make connections between the works we engage and contemporary social and political phenomena. This course is, above all, an invitation to deeply contemplate the thickness of the multiple presents we inhabit, to participate in rigorous social, material, and cultural critique, because IT MATTERS to the project of realizing more livable, joyful, and equitable worlds.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for Gateway Theory course.

ENG 5138
Studies in Film: Cinematic Species: Mythology, Modernity, and Filmic Re-production
Christina Parker-Flynn
cparker@fsu.edu
Th 6:35 p.m.-9:35 p.m.

In symbiotic relation, the cinema and modernity can be seen to operate as points of reflection, re-production, and convergence. The film medium allegorizes major concerns of modernity, especially when paying special attention to modernity as indicative of a change in experience, determined by artificiality and the concept of re-production, and defined in/as/through movement. We will interrogate the re-production of mythologies on screen borne from a particular lineage of nineteenth-century culture and modernity, including concerns of the perpetual mimesis of woman mechanized and fetishized by the camera’s lens, the question of the artificial at all costs, and the very movement inscribed at the heart of modernity and its “moving pictures.” In the course, we will start with the founding myths indexed in early cinema and then aim to theoretically investigate the mythology of the cinematic apparatus itself.

Writers and (film) theorists we will study include André Bazin, Roland Barthes, Raymond Bellour, Jean Epstein, Lucy Fischer, and Tom Gunning. Units of study may focus around the following: “Cinema and the Ruins of Modernity,” a study of early cinema and its Egyptological obsessions; “Electric Eve,” the meeting of electricity and mythology with German expressionism; “Montage, Mechanism, and Movement,” a look at early Soviet cinema and Vertov’s kino-eye; “Sculpting with Light, and Dance,” focused on early cinematic experiments in dance films and the linkage to the plastic arts and the fetishization of the female performer; “Flaneur/Flaneuse,” paired French New Wave films from both masculine/feminine perspective; and “Vertiginous Movement,” an analysis of noir/anxiety films in relation to central questions of movement, reproduction, and urban spaces.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; A Literary Genre (Film)

ENG 5801
History of Text Technologies
Gary Taylor
gtaylor@fsu.edu
M 3:05 p.m.-6:05 p.m.

This course introduces the complex interactions between literary culture and the changing, overlapping media ecologies that have shaped the way we produce, transmit, transform, receive and interpret creative representations of human experience. It provides an accelerated history and theory of “platformalism”: the affordances of forms through which particular technological platforms enable or disable, encourage or discourage aural, textual and visual articulation and communications across spatial, temporal, and social boundaries (class, race, nation, gender). We will sample platforms and the works made for and by them, ranging from tattoo (skin being the earliest matrix for symbolic inscription) to stone, clay, many forms of manuscript (from Sappho’s papyri to Chaucer’s parchments), paper and the many evolutions of print, built acoustic amplifiers (instruments, eunuchs, churches, concert halls, sound recording, radio, audiobooks), and multimedia systems (theatre, cinema, broadcast, digital, streaming). This iteration of the course highlights tipping points, when an emergent and evolving text technology significantly alters an existing literary system (e.g. scroll/codex; script/print; communal/commercial theatre; silent/sound film; print/digital). Technical hybrids are examined for their literary implications (e.g. theatre, marginalia in printed books, the Burroughs archive). More than 51% of the taught course material is taken from the 40,000 years before 1800; but these past revolutions are designed to help us conceptualize the multimedia turmoil of our own time. Topics are explored through case studies and hands-on encounters, accompanied by at least one historical and one theoretical reading per week (with “guest star” appearances by other specialist faculty). Major assessment is of your individual projects, which may concern any time period or technology—though, if you want credit for a pre-1800 course, your major project must focus on pre-1800 textual media.

Requirements: This course satisfies the general literature requirement for one course pre-1800. This course also fulfills the gateway requirement for the History of Text Technologies. It also satisfies 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

ENG 5846
Theories of Difference in Rhetoric and Composition: Critical Race Theory
Rhea Lathan
rlathan@fsu.edu
M/W 6:25 p.m.-7:50 p.m.

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with concepts on how race, class, gender, ability, sexual orientation and/or ethnicity have been theorized and how those theories are put into practice. Students will survey a variety of forms this effort has taken, including how rhetoric and composition studies assembles evidence, argue claims and constructions theories and histories. Ultimately students will assess the implications of current theories for research, teaching and learning in academic and community based contexts. In the end we will try to identify the spaces left in composition specifically the next frontier in rhetoric and composition studies: What's missing? What should be studied now and how? Does the work you do maintain, add to or change current perspectives?

Students will examine a range of disciplinary texts to gain perspectives on ways that researchers and practitioners can and have used difference in research and teaching. You will have the opportunity to read and discuss notions of politically relevant perspectives on difference. Particularly the idea that theories of race, racism and racialization are required in order to better prepare both institutionally and pedagogically for people from underrepresented or minoritized populations.

Requirements: This course satisfies coursework in Rhetoric and Composition (MA and PhD programs). It also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENG 6939
Seminar in English: Global Rhetorics
Tarez Graban
tgraban@fsu.edu
M 3:05 p.m.-6:05 p.m.

This course examines primarily nonwestern rhetorical traditions, exploring foundational and contemporary phases in rhetorics associated with India, China, Greece, Rome, and the Islamic world, calling into question the viability of a single, static “rhetorical tradition.” The premise underlying this course is that we look to the rhetorical practices of the past—including the ways that cultural traditions argue, teach, debate, and historicize their concepts, myths, and philosophies—in order to formulate more robust theories about global rhetorical practices of the present. Moreover, we will be formulating histories and theories of “global/intercultural” rhetoric that students can use as tools for further exploration into an ethnic rhetorical or textual tradition of their choosing. Finally, we will pay attention to the questions and dilemmas that are raised when we attempt to study any tradition or community “interculturally.” Much of our work will be conceptual or methodological, rather than purely historical. That is, while we will read some historical scholarship to help us interact with these “nonwestern traditions,” we will spend more of our time learning to read, interpret, and diffuse more recent recirculations of these traditions without falling into representational traps (as best we can, anyway).

Please note: Given the unique scheduling of this section, there will be a short reading assignment posted in advance of the first class day for students to complete and bring to our first meeting. Interested and/or enrolled students should contact tgraban@fsu.edu in advance for the first-day readings.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition; Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies. This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENG 6939
Novel Writing: Shake Up Your Novel
Elizabeth Stuckey-French
estuckey-french@fsu.edu
Tu 1:20 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

This course will focus on the novel-writing process. Come prepared to discuss a novel you’re already working on, even if that novel is only in the planning stages. If you’re fairly far into a draft of a novel, this class is meant to help you shake up that draft so you can see it in a new light. We will discuss sections of your novel in class and use exercises to tighten and intensify your plot, bring your characters into focus, explore your settings, and more. We also analyze published novels and for inspiration and craft ideas. Students will give group presentations on these novels.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENL 5206
Studies in Old English Language and Literature
David Johnson
djohnson@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 3:05 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

Studies in Old English Language and Literature is an introduction to the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. The cultural and historical entity that we refer to as “Anglo-Saxon England” lasted from about 500-1200. This period saw the production of literature, art and other cultural institutions that are still with us today. In this course we will explore the language of the Anglo-Saxons, focusing initially on learning to translate what to many would appear to be a foreign language, but which in reality is the ancient ancestor of our own.

Please do not be put off by the grammar-intensive schedule that comprises the first part of the course. Old English is the easiest language for a native speaker of English to learn, and moreover, all of the exercises and texts you will be translating are taken directly from one of the richest medieval literary traditions in existence, which means that when you complete this course you will have direct access to that literature. No prior knowledge of Old English or any other synthetic language (such as Latin or German) is required or assumed.

Qui amat uina, non execratur crateras; qui nucleos, non putamina; qui segetes, non boues; qui lac, non uaccas; qui Deum, non proximum; et qui amat scientiam, non abhorreat a grammatica, sine qua nemo eruditis aut sapiens esse poterit.

He who loves wine does not hate goblets; he who loves nuts does not mind nutshells; he who loves corn does not object to oxen; he who loves milk does not detest cows; he who loves God does not hate his neighbor; and he who loves knowledge should not loathe grammar, without which no one can be either learned or wise. — Collectanea

Requirements: This course satisfies the general literature requirement for one course pre-1660. It also fulfills the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: History of Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies.

ENL 5227
Studies in Renaissance Literature: Monstrosity and the Monstrous in Renaissance Literature
Pablo Maurette
pmaurette@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 1:20 p.m.-2:35 p.m.

This course will center on the relationship between fiction, visual arts, and science by focusing on the figure of the monster. The human imagination is capable of producing the most outlandish and distorted forms: we will call this the monstrous. Throughout history, the monstrous has been the terrifying representation of a space where curiosity, love, fear, and disgust come together to haunt human beings. More importantly, the monstrous often sparks debates on identity, difference, providence, the laws of nature, gender, and race. But also science and philosophy have to deal with the deformed, the organically distorted, the preternatural: we will call this monstrosity. Scientific and philosophical discussions on monstrosity ultimately deal with issues pertaining to the order of nature, genetics, and theology. As we will see, science and philosophy often struggle alongside literature to understand deformity and monstrosity. In the 20th and 21st centuries, film also becomes a meaningful stage for a dialogue between nature and human imagination. Throughout this semester we will see how they influence one another as they establish fascinating dialogues. In order to understand contemporary ideas and literary representations of monstrosity and the monstrous we will go on a journey that will take us from antiquity to the 21st century and that will include ancient history and literature, Medieval travel narrative, Renaissance natural science, essay, and drama, a twentieth-century novel and a selection of short stories, evolutionary biology, theory, philosophy, and film. All reading will be done in English translation, although any student wishing to read in the original language(s) is welcome and encouraged.  

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course in literature pre-1660. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: History of Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies.

ENL 5227
Studies in Renaissance Literature: Ecocriticism and Early Modern Literature
Molly Hand
mhand@fsu.edu
Tu 3:05 p.m.-6:05 p.m.

Books of nature and books of beasts – the ancient wisdom of the Physiologus, Pliny’s Historia Naturalis, and Isidore of Seville’s Etymologiae – shaped early modern understandings of the natural world. But that world was itself a book, and discerned properly, the book of nature revealed its hidden meanings and the indelible stamp of the creator. Within that book was a lively bestiary of what we now call animals – what early moderns were more likely to call creatures, a term that also applied to humans. How did early moderns read nature’s book and themselves within it? How did interspecies relations and daily animal encounters influence early modern literature? How did literature, with its innumerable figures and tropes taken from the natural world, affect humans’ behavior toward other creatures within that world? How can we better understand and take seriously the extent to which the shaping fantasies of early modern culture were defined by the nonhuman? And how can an awareness of early moderns’ “thinking with animals” and the natural world help us make sense of environmental concerns in our own time? This course engages with such questions as an avenue for the study of ecocriticism. While our focus is sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and its contexts, each unit also includes contemporary texts that invite us to consider the relations between a past before “the animal” as such, before the Anthropocene, and a present in which the catastrophic environmental effects of human acts are increasingly being felt. Students will develop a strong foundation in ecocriticism and animal studies which may then inform their teaching and research.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course pre-1660 or one course pre-1800. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies.

ENL 5246
Studies in British Romantic Literature: Romanticism and the Birth of Celebrity Culture
Lindsey Eckert
leckert@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

Tell-all memoirs, gossip columns, fashion reporting, unauthorized biographies, fan mail—these genres so central to today’s celebrity-obsessed culture have their roots in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This course will examine the birth of celebrity culture in the Romantic period and the complex relationships between public and private literature that defined it. In the period, readers’ voracious appetite for private information about authors shaped literary production and reception. Reading works by authors including Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, Phillis Wheatley, Lady Caroline Lamb, and especially Lord Byron (who is often recognized as the first celebrity) we will examine how Romanticism’s central texts engaged explicitly and implicitly with debates about celebrity and the boundaries between public and private life.

Requirements: This course fills the general literature requirement for one course in literature 1600-1900. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies: 1600-1900; History of Text Technologies (Reception); or a Literary Genre (Poetry).

LIT 5038
Studies in Poetry: History of Lyric from Sappho to Donne
A.E.B. Coldiron
acoldiron@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 3:05 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

This survey presents both a broad view of the European roots of English lyric poetry and a close look at particular authors and works. We focus on each era's poetry, poetics, and theory, considering (e.g.) genre/subgenres, form, technique, and socio-historical and aesthetic contexts. We'll quickly sample (1) Greek and Roman poetry and poetic theory that were influential over the long term; (2) troubdour/trobairritz and other medieval poetry and theory that shaped English lyric; (3) early modern Italian, French, and Spanish works that most informed English literature. We'll then spend most of our time on (4) the English poetry and theory that branched from those roots. The course emphasis is on influential and recognized authors and works, but we will also read works that challenge emergent canons in various ways (such as satiric, subversive, or experimental works and works by marginalized voices).

Requirements: This course fulfills the general requirement for one course in literature pre-1660 OR pre-1800. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: History of Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies; a Literary Genre (Poetry).

LIT 5038
Studies in Poetry: Letters of the Poets
Barbara Hamby
bhamby@fsu.edu
M 6:35 p.m.-9:35 p.m.

We will be reading excerpts from the letters of poets, beginning in ancient Rome with Ovid and Horace, and moving on Alexander Pope, Byron, Keats, Emily Dickinson, Rimbaud, Rilke, Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Bishop/Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, and ending with Allen Ginsberg’s letters to Jack Kerouac and Gary Snyder. In many of these letters, poets discuss ideas that have become iconic, as in Keats' letter to his brothers in which he works out his ideas about negative capability or Rimbaud's “complete derangement of the sense” and “I is nobody.” They also share their work in their letters, so we can see the genesis of great poems as well as failures. Some great poets won't be addressed, not because they didn't write letters, but because they weren't great letter writers. In this group are Wordsworth and Whitman. And though the concerns of each poet may be different, we will also find the similarities through the ages. Written assignments will include weekly responses to the readings and a final project that can be critical or creative. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course 1660-1900. It also fills the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Literary Genre (Poetry) and Literary Genre (Nonfiction).

LIT 5186
Studies in Irish Literature: Reading Ulysses—in Theory: Happy 100th Birthday Ulysses
S.E. Gontarski
sgontarski@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 4:50 p.m.-6:05 p.m.

Edith Wharton on Ulysses: “a turgid welter of pornography...& unformed & unimportant drivel. Until the raw ingredients of a pudding make a pudding, I shall never believe that the raw material of sensation & thought can make a work of art without the cook’s intervening.”

On the other hand:
“I hold this book to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape.”—T. S. Eliot
“What is so staggering about Ulysses is the fact that behind a thousand veils nothing lies hidden; that it turns neither toward the mind nor toward the world, but, as cold as the moon looking on from cosmic space, allows the drama of growth, being, and decay to pursue its course.”—Carl Jung
“The greatest novel of the 20th century.”—Anthony Burgess
“Ulysses is extraordinarily interesting to those who have patience (and they need it).”—John Middleton Murry
“It is difficult not to acclaim a masterpiece.” —Virginia Woolf

We will spend the semester reading and studying James Joyce’s great novel, always ranked high, frequently number 1, on lists of the greatest works of literature in English—ever. ENG 5933 will read Ulysses closely, as a or the nexus of Modernism, against its sources and textual and philosophical intersections, Homer’s The Odyssey, not least among them. We will examine as well some of its intersections with the visual arts, the illustrations by Matisse not least among them. And since February 2nd, Joyce’s birthday, will mark the 100th anniversary of its publication in 1922, we will remain open to the myriad international activities that will mark the occasion.

Requirements: This course fulfills the requirements for the following Area(s) of Concentration: Post-1900 Literature and Culture (Irish); A Literary Genre (Fiction/Novel).

LIT 5309
Studies in Popular Culture: African American Women, Folklore, and Sexualities
Jerrilyn McGregory
jmcgregory@fsu.edu
Th 6:35 p.m.-9:35 p.m.

This course interrogates the expressive and artistic realms of African American (AFAM) women in relation to questions of politics, power, resistance, and creativity. In the context of Africana women, topics will include: trickster-troping; the cult of respectability; and radical gender subjectivities as relates to blues women; female desire; hip-hop culture, neo-soul, comediennes, and Black feminisms.

Requirements: The course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: African-American Literary, Folklore, and Cultural Studies; and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

LIT 5309
Studies in Popular Culture: Pulp/Cult
Aaron Jaffe
ajaffe@fsu.edu
M/W 6:25 p.m.-7:50 p.m.

Pulp: 1.) any soft, soggy mass, 2.) the soft moist part, 3.) the inside of a tooth, and 4.) sensational literature printed cheaply on inexpensive paper.

Cult: 1.) religious-like adherence, 2. a fad, 3.) interest followed with exaggerated zeal.

Count Dracula of Monte Cristo, Sherlock Bond, Orlando Pimpernel, Frank-N-Furter, Svengali Dedalus, Supertramp, the Dude, the Beetle, Tarzan Presley, Stagg R. Leigh, the original Homer Simpson, the good Dr. Thompson—we’ll look at a literary family including some of these and other pulp/cult characters and investigate cultural theory, literary fan culture and readership.

Requirements: The course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Post-1900 Lit and Cultural Studies; A Literary Genre (Fiction/Novel)

LIT 5388
Studies in Women’s Literature: Feminism and Travel
Celia Caputi
celia.caputi@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

“‘… As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.’” —Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas

This course is premised on the notion of travel and mobility as feminist issues. From Chaucer’s Wife of Bath onward, women who “get around” have been viewed with fascination and loathing by masculinist-xenophobic ideologues, and female mobility (when not enforced by what Gayle Rubin famously termed “the traffic in women”) has been stigmatized, eroticized, exoticized, and demonized. At the same time, having the means to travel—and the intellectual and spiritual freedom travel proffers—can be celebrated as marks of an individual woman’s empowerment within a given culture. In this course we will explore journey narratives and tropes of mobility in literature by women from a number of theoretical perspectives. Featured authors include Toni Morrison, Marjane Satrapi, Cheryl Strayed, Mary Wollstonecraft and Virginia Woolf. Requirements include weekly reading response papers; active participation; final paper; presentation.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area(s) of Concentration: Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. The course also meets the Alterity requirement.