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Graduate Courses

AML 5027
Studies in US Literature since 1875: American Literature and Culture of the 1950s and 1960s
Andrew Epstein
aepstein@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

This seminar investigates the relationship between the cultural and historical conditions that characterize the two decades following World War II and developments in literature, as well as music, visual art, and other cultural forms. Blending literary analysis and cultural history, our goal is to explore how various cultural forms respond to, reflect, subvert, and shape the dynamics of post-World War II American culture. We will pay special attention to the radical, oppositional aesthetics that emerged in a wide range of fields, including fiction, poetry, music (jazz, rock), art, and movies. We will also consider the continuities and discontinuities between the allegedly placid 1950s and the turbulent 1960s.

In general, the course will explore how and why postwar American writers and artists invented unconventional aesthetic and political strategies to cope with changing ideas about the nature of the self, language and literary form, racial and sexual identity, and the nature of "America" itself, in a world undergoing dramatic transformations. Readings will likely include Shirley Jackson, Ralph Ellison, John Cheever, Richard Yates, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, Thomas Pynchon, Donald Barthelme, Joan Didion, Joyce Carol Oates.

Requirements: This satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Post-1900 Literature and Culture.

AML 5608
Studies in the African American Literary Tradition: Rewriting the Future: The Postapocalyptic Black Female Imagination
M. L. Montgomery
mmontgomery@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 9:45-11 a.m.

This course surveys representative works of speculative fiction and expressive culture by black women in an Afro-diasporic geography, including the United States, Africa, and the Anglo Caribbean. We will read and discuss fiction by Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, and Nnedi Okorafor alongside texts by authors previously excluded from an Afro-futurist canon, such as Jesmyn Ward, Edwidge Danticat, and Gloria Naylor. Notions of history, hybridity, liminality, and border-crossing will figure prominently in our investigative undertaking as will ideas surrounding the role of queered bodies and their role in framing futuristic imaginaries. Our inquiry culminates with a discussion of Beyoncé's visual album Black Is King as an instance of black women's intervention into fantasy culture.

Using the work of Mark Dery, George Lipsitz, Tricia Rose, Greg Tate, Ytasha L. Womack, and others as the discursive springboard for our discussion, this course enables a critique of mainstream science fiction's reliance upon tropes of whiteness, maleness, and heterosexual normativity. Ultimately, our investigation seeks to expand the scholarly conversation surrounding black fantasy culture in ways that take into account contributions by black women across the trans-Atlantic world.

Required Texts:

  • Jessmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
  • Edwidge Danticat, Claire of the Sea Light
  • Octavia Butler, Fledgling
  • Toni Morrison, Tar Baby
  • Gloria Naylor, Mama Day
  • Nnedi Okorafor, Binti
  • Nalo Hopkinson, Brown Girl in the Ring
  • Erna Brodber, Myal
  • Beyonce, Black Is King

Recommended Readings:

  • Ytasha L. Womack, Afro-Futurism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture
  • George Lipsitz, Dangerous Crossroads: Popular Music, Postmodernism, and the Poetics of Place
  • Mary Dery, ed. Flame Wars: The Discourse of Cyberculture
  • Kristen Lillvis, Posthuman Blackness and the Black Female Imagination
  • Lamonda Horton Stallings, Mutha is Half a Word
  • Sheree Thomas, ed. Dark Matter: Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in Postcolonial, Transnational, Gender, and Cultural Studies or for Areas of Concentration: History of a Literary Genre (Fiction). It also meets the Alterity requirement.

 

AML 5608
Studies in the African American Literary Tradition: Black Femme Theory
Alisha Gaines
amgaines@fsu.edu
M/W 6:35-7:50 p.m.

While this novel coronavirus has restricted and restructured our lives and sociality, not everything about this moment is new. Racism and police brutality aren’t new. Xenophobia isn’t new. And governments and corporations putting profit over people isn’t new. As the world scrambles to find ways to understand and manage precarity and vulnerability in the face of these pandemics, this course turns to Black Studies in general, and Black Femme Theory specifically, as a primer for physical, emotional, and intellectual survival. Beholden to Jessica Marie Johnson’s work in Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020), Black Femme Theory articulates practices of freedom among Black women and femmes beyond heteronormative constraints and cisgendered assumptions about and since transatlantic slavery. Despite all the historical and contemporary assaults on Black life in the United States, we are still here. Through fiction, film, poetry, and essays, this course seeks to answer Lucille Clifton’s invocation in her 1993 poem, “won’t you celebrate with me”:
come celebrate
with me that everyday
something has tried to kill me
and has failed.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies, African American Literary and Cultural Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. It also fulfills the Alterity requirement.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Robert Olen Butler
rbutler@fsu.edu
M, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

The fall graduate fiction workshop under Robert Olen Butler will, as it traditionally does, focus intensively on the essentials of process in creating literary narrative. Given the most elusive and crucial of these essentials, the workshop will propose an aesthetic theory of the short short story, both as a distinct art form and as an image of the first pages of any work of viable fiction regardless of length, and students will write short short stories (or de facto beginnings) until the essential is mastered. When that is achieved, they will have a chance to write onward from there. And yes, my deeply considered conviction—based on nearly four decades of teaching experience—is that this pursuit is crucial even for advanced graduate students. Indeed, for all of us.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Mark Winegardner
mwinegardner@fsu.edu
W, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

This course is a rigorous traditional workshop. At its core is the premise that any student work under discussion could be better. In a great majority of fiction handed in to a graduate workshop, the thing that most needs to get better is the storytelling and structure. To attack that, this class will take a nuts-and-bolts approach to the mastering the fundamentals of what a story is and how it's put together.

The default mode here is that students will be expected to workshop, revise, and re-submit two short stories (though you will have the opportunity workshop three). If you wish to workshop any portion of a novel, we will meet one-on-one to custom-tailor a workshop strategy for that book (rather than treating it the way we would a short story).

“A writer,” said Saul Bellow, "”is a reader moved to emulation.” “I know of no good, ignorant writers,” wrote Richard Wilbur. “I think of great stories and novels,” said Charles Baxter, “as permission-givers.” This course will develop your writing in tandem with your reading, to eradicate ignorance, receive permission, and be moved to great heights of emulation. The strangeness of individual talent will not be blunted by such things. Quite the contrary.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop
Jillian Weise
jweise@fsu.edu
Tu, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

In this graduate poetry workshop emphasis will obviously be on your poems and the writing you generate during the course. I run workshop using a bit of the traditional model and some "hacks," or ways to give each poet an opportunity to talk-back–queer/crip/borg–the workshop space. We decline the presumptive “Everyman” speaker of poems in favor of recognizing diverse identities and points-of-view. Questions we will want to know: Who is the speaker? What’s the speaker saying? And maybe, especially, what’s the speaker not saying? I love Gwendolyn Brooks's line, from In Montgomery, “I am here to assemble, I am here to conduct / interrupted order. / I am Code.” Workshop will give you support and community as you assemble, conduct, code, innovate, and create.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop: The Solotaroff Protocol
David Kirby
dkirby@fsu.edu
W, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

In A Few Good Voices in My Head, Ted Solotaroff says that a piece of writing is a writer’s “only way to organize and to some extent comprehend life’s fullness and perplexity.” In this class we’ll be studying and writing that kind of poem in a format that departs from the traditional workshop set-up. There’s nothing wrong with sitting in a circle and passing poems around and discussing them, but here we’ll mainly be studying craft in the first month and, after that, alternating between select students giving 20-minute readings of their work to the rest of the class and roundtable discussions of additional craft issues and particular poems presented by individual students. Expect to write a poem a week and, when you’re not sharing it with the class, sending it to the instructor. Expect as well to partner with someone with whom you’ll swap poems weekly and also exchange portfolios in the last week of class. The result? More fully realized and engaging poems. By the way, I call this class “The Solotaroff Protocol” because that sounds vaguely like a Cold War thriller involving a protagonist who (a) starts with a plan that (b) quickly goes awry even though (c) things work out in the end if (d) not in the way anyone thought they would. You know, the way poems do.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5217
Topics in Editing: The Politics of Critical Style
Judith Pascoe
jpascoe@fsu.edu
M, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

This course invites graduate students from all disciplines to gauge the perils and potential of academic discourse. In the first section of the class, “The Academic Essay and Its Discontents,” we will read diagnoses of the critical prose “problem” (one written by an historian, another by an art critic, and a third by an academic press editor), before going on to discuss disciplinary norms and values in prose style. The second section, “The Lessons of the Masters,” focuses on exemplary critical essays by Naomi Schor, Carolyn Steedman, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, D.A. Miller, and Vladimir Nabokov, among others. The third and final section, “Critical Avant-Gardism,” explores the elasticity of the critical essay form as practiced by Nicholson Baker, Wayne Koestenbaum, and David Markson, among others. Throughout, we’ll investigate the virtuoso sentences of critical stylists in order to figure out how they use grammar and syntax to launch charm offensives or to slay giants.

Students should come to class with a previously written essay or dissertation chapter on which they can carry out a series of exercises focusing on narrative voice, nominal versus verbal style, parallel structure, narrative suspense, compression and dilation, periodic versus cumulative style, and metaphorical language. Texts for the class consist of short pieces available on Canvas, as well as the following books: Maira Kalman’s illustrated edition of Strunk and White’s Elements of Style, Nicholson Baker’s U and I, and James Elkins’s What Happened to Art Criticism? If possible (and affordable), please purchase a used copy of Lydia Fakundiny’s out-of-print The Art of the Essay.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition. It also counts toward the Certificate in Publishing and Editing. For PhD students, the class counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5317
Graduate Article and Essay Workshop: Creative Nonfiction
Ravi Howard
ryhoward@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

At a symposium on his work in 2000, John Edgar Wideman was asked about his nonfiction approach, and his approach was, to paraphrase, certain things have happened to me, and this is my version of it. I want the workshop to focus on the connection between “certain things” and the “version” you build through structure. In my nonfiction and fiction teaching, I’ve used Jane Alison’s Meander, Spiral, Explode to narrative structure. She names different forms—waves, cycles, etc.— that we create in individual narratives and connected manuscripts. We’ll consider her examples as we read about your essays, memoir chapters, chunks, vignettes, or any other unit of measurement you’re using to build your non-fiction. Workshop members have the option of submitting fiction, and we'll discuss the techniques that connect prose forms and those that highlight the distinctions. Since we will have a mix of prose writers and poets in the class, we’ll consider works by poets and writers such as Natasha Trethewey’s Memorial Drive and Marilynne Nelson’s What Are We Doing Here? I want to dedicate some time to writing the autobiographical craft essay and craft essays in general. We will have an opportunity to explore writers like Matthew Salesses, Edwidge Danticat, Maud Casey, and others.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework. The course is open to all CRW graduate students; other interested students can apply for admission by contacting the professor.

ENC 5421
Digital Revolution and Convergence Culture
Michael Neal
mrneal@fsu.edu
Th, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

This course will explore digital technologies in relationship to composing processes, practices, texts, and interactions. We will also consider pedagogical, research, and scholarship implications of digital composition. The course will be divided into three units: 1) Media Theories (e.g., new media, multimedia, multimodality, hypermedia, remediation, networks, circulation), 2) Interactive Communities (e.g., fan, activist, gaming, social media, blogs), and 3) Digital Composition (e.g., hypertext, curation, assemblages, remix, wikis, podcasts, digital video). Students will produce a number of small digital compositions throughout the semester that they will curate and assemble into a final portfolio. Weekly reflections will include applications to pedagogy, research, and publishing practices.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition. This course fulfills 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

ENC 5700
Theories of Composition
Jaclyn Fiscus-Cannaday
jfiscus@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

In this course, we will explore composition theory as they have emerged throughout our field’s history, especially in the U.S. In doing so, we will consider how composition history informs the ways in which composition theories are accounted for and valued today. The course will require you to consider practical applications of what you learn, requiring that you critical engage with course readings to create teaching materials and to design future research projects.

Requirements: This course fulfills a concentration requirement within the Rhetoric and Composition PhD program and a coursework requirement in the Rhetoric and Composition MA.

ENG 5028
Rhetorical Theory and Practice: Issues, Theories, and Performances
Kristie Fleckenstein
kfleckenstein@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

The latter part of the twentieth century is marked by what neopragmatist Richard Rorty has called the “linguistic turn,” where we live the world historically and know it linguistically. Language is the tool of tool in our cultural toolbox, a move that realigns poetics, aesthetics, and the architectonic arts of rhetoric. While Rorty announced this linguistic turn in 1964, philosopher I.A. Richards made a similar argument for the centrality of rhetoric 30 years earlier. Thus, our entry into modernism during the early decades of the twentieth century and our entry into post-modernism during the latter decades of the twentieth century can be characterized as a rhetorical as well as a linguistic turn.

Our goal in this course is to identify configurations of twentieth- and twenty-first century rhetorics, trace their Western roots, and interrogate both roots and rhetorics. We will do that by exploring the play of truth, knowledge, power, and performance across various theories of rhetoric, seeking to create a dialectic rather than a binary between Western and non-Western, masculinist and feminist, rational and nonrational, discursive and material.

Requirements include four response essays (2-3 pages single spaced), a midterm project, a “Did You Know?” presentation, and a final seminar paper that evolves from your midterm project.

Requirements: This course fulfills the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition. This course fulfills 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

ENG 5049
Studies in Critical Theory: Precarity
Robin Goodman
rgoodman@fsu.edu
Tu/Th,3:05-4:20 p.m.

This course looks to works in literature and theory to explore one of the basic challenges to democracy in our time: precarity. Today’s dominant hegemonic order sets itself as, for the most part, unanswerable to the majority, unrelatable, and inaccessible. Experiences of dispossession and detachment inform our sense of agency and citizenship as political and economic power is increasingly wrested away from representing the worker and the citizen. Though precarity certainly inherits legacies of colonialism and imperialism, this new phase of democratic retrenchment involves new constructions of racial and gender identity and inequality. Marginalization and disengagement have produced, on the psychological front, alienation and paranoia; on the political front, statelessness, militarism, terror, and the demise of the institutions through which citizens in a democracy have traditionally made demands and voiced grievances; on the economic front, financial and employment insecurity, gig work, worker obsolescence, and austerity, in addition to sickness and contamination, environmental collapse, and the increasing sense that we are always one step behind the technologies of our generation. In this course, we will consider the causes and effects of precarity as a dominant modern life-form by reading authors possibly including but not limited to: Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Daniel Schreber, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi, Georgio Agamben, Zygmunt Bauman, Wendy Brown, Grégoire Chamayou, Judith Butler, Erich Fromm, Theodor Adorno, Gayatri Spivak, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Robin Kelley, Saidiya Hartman, Yoko Ogawa, Clarice Lispector, Ling Ma, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Requirements: This course requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Post-1900 Literature and Culture. It also fulfills the Alterity requirement.

ENG 5049
Studies in Critical Theory: Black Anti-Capitalism/Critiques of Racial Capitalism
John Mac Kilgore
kmkilgore@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 1:20-2:35 p.m.

A course devoted to Black intellectual critiques of political economy and racial capitalism. Will cover the rich legacies of Black anarchism, socialism, Marxism. In design, hope to read full-length essays and books. Students can expect to encounter work by W.E.B. Du Bois, Lucy Parsons, Hubert Harrison, C.L.R. James, Eric Williams, Aimé Césaire, Kwame Nkrumah, Claudia Jones, Frantz Fanon, Angela Davis, Huey P. Newton, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Combahee River Collective, bell hooks, Cornel West, Cedric J. Robinson, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Robin D.G. Kelley.

Requirements: This course requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Post-1900 Literature and Culture. It also fulfills the Alterity requirement.

ENG 5079
Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies
Carla Della Gatta
cdellagatta@fsu.edu
M/W, 6:35-7:50 p.m.

Why theory? What are the frameworks that have shaped the interpretation of literature and how have they developed and shifted over time? Through what lenses and ideologies do we define terms such as author, text, narrative? What does it mean to be “critical?” This course will provide a historical introduction to various schools of thought from literary studies, cultural studies, and philosophy, as well as their intersections. In addition, we will distinguish between research methods and theoretical methodologies for analyzing a text. Finally, we will address the field of cultural studies that encompasses issues of identity (race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ableism, neurodiversity, etc.), political economy, and performance and new media. Students will learn about the primary tenets of major schools of theory as a foundation for their study of literature.

The class will address the major schools of literary theory through works by Richard Schechner, Jacques Derrida, Edmund Husserl, Julia Kristeva, Michel Foucault, and Stephen Greenblatt. Likewise, the course will engage with a sampling of the branches of cultural studies, with possible selections from Gloria Anzaldúa, Judith Butler, Richard Dyer, Stuart Hall, José Martí, Laura Mulvey, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Raymond Williams, Sylvia Wynter, and others.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for Gateway Theory course.

ENG 5079
Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies
John J. Garcia
jjgarcia@fsu.edu
T/Th, 3:05p.m.-4:20 p.m.

This version of ENG 5079 is organized around critique as a theoretical practice with roots in German philosophy and Western Marxism. After surveying key writings by Kant, Marx, and Nietzsche, we will discuss how these perspectives have been taken up by the Frankfurt School and in French thought. We will consider recent challenges to critique's effectiveness by Latour and Felski and how these challenges have inspired newer models for literary criticism: “surface” reading, a “descriptive” turn, and a renewed formalism. Later readings focus on the interconnections between aesthetics and politics (Arendt, Rancière), a possible return to ideology, and attempts to theorize the pandemic. Finally, we will read selections from scholars who extend critique to black music (Fumi Okiji) and historicism (Stephen Best).

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for Gateway Theory course.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Decadence, Modernity, and Globalization
Robert Stilling
rstilling@fsu.edu
Th, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

Since the nineteenth century, literary “decadence” has long been associated with the end of great periods in history, the decline of nations and empires, with a poetics that turns away from the world, with sexual deviance and moral degeneracy, and an obsession with art for its own sake. Nevertheless, as much recent scholarship has shown, the concept of decadence has expanded to capture the perennial sense of crisis and decline that characterizes modernity right up to our present moment. This course will begin with familiar fin-de-siècle decadents such as Oscar Wilde and J.-K. Huysmans but will quickly move through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to survey how literary decadence has evolved in the face of colonialism, global migration, secularization, and other contemporary crises.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies—American, British, Irish; Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies. It also fulfills the Alterity requirement.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: College Composition Practicum
Michael Neal
mrneal@fsu.edu
W, 3:05-3:55 p.m.

This practicum will help new graduate teaching assistants acclimate into their departmental responsibilities, whether they are teaching in the College Composition Program or consulting in the Reading Writing Center or Digital Studio. Students will participate in activities, discussions, and speakers designed to help them manage their workloads, work with a diverse range of students, and navigate the requirements of their departmental responsibilities.

Requirements: All new graduate assistants in the English Department must register for one hour of this course in Fall 2021.

ENG 5998
Placement Practicum
Tarez Samra Graban
tgraban@fsu.edu
W, F 12:00-1:15 p.m.

This single-semester practicum will be offered on a S/U basis to graduate students who are ABD and past prospectus or otherwise actively on the market with the intention of finishing up within the next academic year (2021-2022). Enrolled students will meet and work weekly on the preparation of their written materials; on interview, job talk, teaching demonstration, and campus visit protocols; and on related professionalization topics that are unique to academic and some alt-academic positions. Some reading may be involved, but the majority of time and attention would be given to documenting and mastering the search from start to finish and beginning to articulate a professional trajectory beyond graduate school. Primary goals of this practicum: (1) to encourage early, regular, and sustained participation individually and in workshop for students who are active on the market in academic and alt-academic positions; and (2) to expose job seekers to the kinds of scholarly genres and teaching and research trajectories they might encounter in their next professional role. NB: Practicum meetings will occur on Fridays; the Wednesday hour may occasionally be used for supplemental workshops or guest roundtables. Interested students should enroll by end of April so as to receive essential job preparation materials in advance of Fall 2021.

ENL 5227
Studies in the Renaissance: Milton
Bruce Boehrer
bboehrer@fsu.edu
Th, 11:35 a.m.-2:35 p.m.

Study of Paradise Lost and selected earlier verse, with particular emphasis on close reading, gender dynamics, and the intersection of classical and Christian traditions.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course pre-1660 or for one course pre-1800. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in Areas of Concentration: History of a Literary Genre (Poetry).

ENL 5227
Renaissance Literature: Multimedia Shakespeare
Terri Bourus (Theresa Mategrano)
terri.bourus@fsu.edu
M, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

This course will examine Shakespeare’s relationship to the transformative media of early modern England. Shakespeare was the most popular English author in the English printed book trade from 1592 to 1640, and his works have never been out of print since. He was also the most successful English playwright of the period, and in terms of revivals he is still the most popular playwright in English. What made Shakespeare’s writing so appealing to these two very different media? and how has it continued to appeal to evolving media structures? We will look at his relationships with individual printers, publishers, playing companies, theatrical infrastructure, and the bodies of performers. We will use contemporary media to compensate for the fact that Tallahassee does not possess any first editions of Shakespeare or any professional theatre company specializing in his plays: online digital facsimiles of early editions and recordings of theatrical performances (including photography, silent film, sound film, and evolving conventions for filming live performances). Works studied will include Shakespeare’s Sonnets, The Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, and Henry V.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course pre-1660 or for one course pre-1800. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies (through 1660); History of Text Technologies; or a Literary Genre (Drama).

ENL 5236
Studies in Restoration/18th Century British Literature: Rebellion, Slavery, & Abolition in the British Atlantic
Candace Ward
candace.ward@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20-2:35 p.m.

In 1807 Britain’s parliament passed the Act To Abolish the Slave Trade; in 1833, the Emancipation Act was passed, effective August 1834 with the implementation of the Apprenticeship period, followed in 1838 with “full freedom.” In this course, we will examine what Ian Baucom in Specters of the Atlantic describes as the “piling up” of history, contextualizing the events that shaped the “fatal Atlantic beginning of the modern”—Caribbean slavery—and leading up to these landmark legislations. The discourses of rebellion, slavery, and abolition that provide this context cross generic and chronological lines: our enquiries begin in the Restoration period, with Henry Neville’s “porno-topia,” The Isle of Pines (1668) and Aphra Behn’s novella recounting the story of the rebellious slave Oroonoko; moving into the eighteenth century, we’ll not only encounter proplanter georgic poetry like James Grainger’s four-book The Sugar-Cane and ameliorist novels like William Earle’s Obi, but also planter-historian Edward Long’s description of Tacky’s Revolt in his History of Jamaica. These reports, along with slave narratives by Olaudah Equiano and Mary Prince, oral histories from Jamaica’s Maroon communities, and Marlon James’s historical novel Book of Night Women, bring alive what Caribbean historian Hilary Beckles calls “one protracted struggle launched by Africans and their Afro-West Indian progeny against slave owners”—a struggle that spanned more than three centuries.

As we explore the complexities and contradictions embedded in these narratives, we will also work to avoid the “facile normalization of the present” (David Scott, Conscripts of Modernity). In other words, we will refuse to essentialize differences between “us” and the historical “them” of our enquiry and look to these texts for our “now.”

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course pre-1800 or one course 1660-1900. This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies; British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies: 1660-1900; History of a Literary Genre (Fiction). The course also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENL 5256
Studies in Victorian Literature: Victorian Health Humanities
Meegan Kennedy (Margaret Kennedy Hanson)
meegan.kennedy@fsu.edu
Tuesdays 11.35-2.35

Those writing during the long nineteenth century witnessed the greatest period of medical change in history, including the rise of statistical medicine and debates over the “art” or “science” of medical practice. It is not surprising, then, that Victorian texts provide a provocative groundwork for surveying current theoretical approaches in the health humanities (an umbrella term for fields combining analysis from humanities fields such as literature, history, or philosophy, with study of medical practice – sometimes known as the medical humanities).

We will discuss a number of subfields of “the health humanities” to understand the strengths and weaknesses of disparate approaches such as literature and medicine, history of medicine, narrative medicine, pathography, disability studies, and bioethics.

What kinds of questions do these fields address today? Issues of patient dignity and patient agency, medical racism, body image, disability rights, access to and inequities in healthcare, reproductive autonomy, public and community health, environmental health and justice, health policy, end-of-life care, the politics of pain relief, genomics and genetic counseling, norms of medical education, medical professionalism, rhetoric of medicine, medical storytelling, and many more.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course in 1660-1900. It also course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies 1660-1900.

LIT 5038
Studies in Poetry
James Kimbrell
jkimbrell@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20 p.m.-4:20 p.m.

Email instructor for course description.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Literary Genre (Poetry).